Young people's perceptions of mental and physical health in the context of general wellbeing.

Craig Bartle, J.H. Singletary, N Svirydzenka, N.M. Suter-Giorgini, A.M. Cashmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Increased recognition of the need for health education in schools has seen advances in health
literacy in recent years. Most of these have focussed on physical health, whereas education about mental
health is generally lacking and focussed on tackling stigma rather than promoting good mental health. This
study evaluated a pilot intervention designed to improve young people’s understanding of good mental
health as a key aspect of wellbeing and explored their perceptions of health and wellbeing.
Methods: A total of 218 13-year-olds participated in an interactive workshop about healthy eating, physical
activity and mental health. Young people’s understanding and perceptions were assessed through anonymous
questionnaires at the start and end of the workshop. Common themes were identified and differences preand
post-workshop and between girls and boys were analysed.
Results: Nearly all young people (100% before, 97% after) perceived being healthy to mean being physically
healthy. A minority (8%) also considered mental health to be a component of general health, which
increased to 12% after the workshop. Understandings of mental health broadened after the workshop.
Interestingly, many mentioned physical health when asked to describe mental health, both before and after
the workshop. Girls’ and boys’ responses were similar except for more girls including social relationships in
their descriptions of mental health.
Conclusion: In this study, we have discovered much about how young people perceive health in general
and mental health. Such information is useful for targeting future interventions. Students’ understanding of
mental health and its importance to wellbeing can be improved through short combined health interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-269
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Education Journal
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Mental Health
Education
Health
Health Education
Students

Keywords

  • Adolescent health
  • attitudes to health
  • health education
  • intervention
  • mental health

Cite this

Young people's perceptions of mental and physical health in the context of general wellbeing. / Bartle, Craig; Singletary, J.H.; Svirydzenka, N; Suter-Giorgini, N.M.; Cashmore, A.M.

In: Health Education Journal, Vol. 74, No. 3, 2015, p. 257-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bartle, Craig ; Singletary, J.H. ; Svirydzenka, N ; Suter-Giorgini, N.M. ; Cashmore, A.M. / Young people's perceptions of mental and physical health in the context of general wellbeing. In: Health Education Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 74, No. 3. pp. 257-269.
@article{f616065b4a404c8688059c67b30f5242,
title = "Young people's perceptions of mental and physical health in the context of general wellbeing.",
abstract = "Objectives: Increased recognition of the need for health education in schools has seen advances in healthliteracy in recent years. Most of these have focussed on physical health, whereas education about mentalhealth is generally lacking and focussed on tackling stigma rather than promoting good mental health. Thisstudy evaluated a pilot intervention designed to improve young people’s understanding of good mentalhealth as a key aspect of wellbeing and explored their perceptions of health and wellbeing.Methods: A total of 218 13-year-olds participated in an interactive workshop about healthy eating, physicalactivity and mental health. Young people’s understanding and perceptions were assessed through anonymousquestionnaires at the start and end of the workshop. Common themes were identified and differences preandpost-workshop and between girls and boys were analysed.Results: Nearly all young people (100{\%} before, 97{\%} after) perceived being healthy to mean being physicallyhealthy. A minority (8{\%}) also considered mental health to be a component of general health, whichincreased to 12{\%} after the workshop. Understandings of mental health broadened after the workshop.Interestingly, many mentioned physical health when asked to describe mental health, both before and afterthe workshop. Girls’ and boys’ responses were similar except for more girls including social relationships intheir descriptions of mental health.Conclusion: In this study, we have discovered much about how young people perceive health in generaland mental health. Such information is useful for targeting future interventions. Students’ understanding ofmental health and its importance to wellbeing can be improved through short combined health interventions.",
keywords = "Adolescent health, attitudes to health, health education, intervention, mental health",
author = "Craig Bartle and J.H. Singletary and N Svirydzenka and N.M. Suter-Giorgini and A.M. Cashmore",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1177/0017896914533219",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "257--269",
journal = "Health Education Journal",
issn = "0017-8969",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Young people's perceptions of mental and physical health in the context of general wellbeing.

AU - Bartle, Craig

AU - Singletary, J.H.

AU - Svirydzenka, N

AU - Suter-Giorgini, N.M.

AU - Cashmore, A.M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Objectives: Increased recognition of the need for health education in schools has seen advances in healthliteracy in recent years. Most of these have focussed on physical health, whereas education about mentalhealth is generally lacking and focussed on tackling stigma rather than promoting good mental health. Thisstudy evaluated a pilot intervention designed to improve young people’s understanding of good mentalhealth as a key aspect of wellbeing and explored their perceptions of health and wellbeing.Methods: A total of 218 13-year-olds participated in an interactive workshop about healthy eating, physicalactivity and mental health. Young people’s understanding and perceptions were assessed through anonymousquestionnaires at the start and end of the workshop. Common themes were identified and differences preandpost-workshop and between girls and boys were analysed.Results: Nearly all young people (100% before, 97% after) perceived being healthy to mean being physicallyhealthy. A minority (8%) also considered mental health to be a component of general health, whichincreased to 12% after the workshop. Understandings of mental health broadened after the workshop.Interestingly, many mentioned physical health when asked to describe mental health, both before and afterthe workshop. Girls’ and boys’ responses were similar except for more girls including social relationships intheir descriptions of mental health.Conclusion: In this study, we have discovered much about how young people perceive health in generaland mental health. Such information is useful for targeting future interventions. Students’ understanding ofmental health and its importance to wellbeing can be improved through short combined health interventions.

AB - Objectives: Increased recognition of the need for health education in schools has seen advances in healthliteracy in recent years. Most of these have focussed on physical health, whereas education about mentalhealth is generally lacking and focussed on tackling stigma rather than promoting good mental health. Thisstudy evaluated a pilot intervention designed to improve young people’s understanding of good mentalhealth as a key aspect of wellbeing and explored their perceptions of health and wellbeing.Methods: A total of 218 13-year-olds participated in an interactive workshop about healthy eating, physicalactivity and mental health. Young people’s understanding and perceptions were assessed through anonymousquestionnaires at the start and end of the workshop. Common themes were identified and differences preandpost-workshop and between girls and boys were analysed.Results: Nearly all young people (100% before, 97% after) perceived being healthy to mean being physicallyhealthy. A minority (8%) also considered mental health to be a component of general health, whichincreased to 12% after the workshop. Understandings of mental health broadened after the workshop.Interestingly, many mentioned physical health when asked to describe mental health, both before and afterthe workshop. Girls’ and boys’ responses were similar except for more girls including social relationships intheir descriptions of mental health.Conclusion: In this study, we have discovered much about how young people perceive health in generaland mental health. Such information is useful for targeting future interventions. Students’ understanding ofmental health and its importance to wellbeing can be improved through short combined health interventions.

KW - Adolescent health

KW - attitudes to health

KW - health education

KW - intervention

KW - mental health

U2 - 10.1177/0017896914533219

DO - 10.1177/0017896914533219

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 257

EP - 269

JO - Health Education Journal

JF - Health Education Journal

SN - 0017-8969

IS - 3

ER -