"You Keep Yourself Strong": A Discourse Analysis of African Women Asylum Seekers' Talk about Emotions

Maria Clare, Simon Goodman, Helen Liebling, Hannah Laing

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)
    49 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    The current study investigates how asylum-seeking African women use talk about emotion to construct empowered roles for themselves. A discourse analysis was conducted on interviews with African asylum-seeking women. Participants used two interacting repertoires, ‘rejecting pity’ and ‘being strong’, to resist inferior positions. By constructing themselves as strong and not needing pity, participants positioned themselves as in control of their lives, and thus presented as responsible and capable mothers, a role they are accountable for. Clinical implications and findings for future research are discussed
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)83-95
    JournalJournal of International Women's Studies
    Volume15
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

    Fingerprint

    asylum seeker
    discourse analysis
    emotion
    interview

    Bibliographical note

    This article is published in an open access journal and this item is available as part of Virtual Commons, the open-access institutional repository of Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, Mass. at http://vc.bridgew.edu/jiws/vol15/iss1/6/

    Keywords

    • African
    • Asylum-Seeker
    • Emotions
    • Strong
    • Women

    Cite this

    "You Keep Yourself Strong": A Discourse Analysis of African Women Asylum Seekers' Talk about Emotions. / Clare, Maria; Goodman, Simon; Liebling, Helen; Laing, Hannah.

    In: Journal of International Women's Studies, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 83-95.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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