Women entrepreneurs in South Africa: Maintaining a balance between culture, personal life, and business

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Bridget Irene’s chapter analyses the work–life balance issues that impact the success of women entrepreneurs in South Africa. Addressing the need to identify the factors that affect success in SMEs owned and managed by women, Irene presents an overview of the perceived impact of work–life balance and the perception of success amongst women entrepreneurs. Maintaining a balance between business and family life has gained attention in the mainstream research on women’s entrepreneurship. Irene’s findings suggest that most South African women entrepreneurs are concerned with achieving a better work–life balance and do not seek financial success at the expense of their family lives, whether their own or those of their employees. Therefore, it is necessary to reconsider women’s entrepreneurship as an avenue for social and cultural change, not just a route to financial emancipation. While, in contrast to the constraints of a traditional job, entrepreneurship offers a woman the flexibility to manage her multiple obligations, some women see their success as being hindered by their first priority (given the societal views and obligations), which is always family, not their businesses. Female entrepreneurs also consider their personal competency vital to their success, and feel the need for self-development in order to succeed in a society that still undermines and doubts the abilities of women to manage a business.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWomen Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research
EditorsShumaila Yousafzai, Alain Fayolle, Adam Lindgreen, Colette Henry, Saadat Saeed, Shandana Sheikh
PublisherEdward Elgar Publishing Ltd.
Chapter6
Pages90-106
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)978 1 78643 450 0
ISBN (Print)978 1 78643 449 4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Feb 2018

Publication series

NameWomen Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research

Fingerprint

Women entrepreneurs
South Africa
Work-life balance
Obligation
Women's entrepreneurship
Family life
Cultural change
Employees
Emancipation
Competency
Expenses
Entrepreneurship
Self development
Female entrepreneurs
Factors
Small and medium-sized enterprises
Africa

Cite this

Irene, B. (2018). Women entrepreneurs in South Africa: Maintaining a balance between culture, personal life, and business. In S. Yousafzai, A. Fayolle, A. Lindgreen, C. Henry, S. Saeed, & S. Sheikh (Eds.), Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research (pp. 90-106). (Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research). Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.4337/9781786434500.00016

Women entrepreneurs in South Africa: Maintaining a balance between culture, personal life, and business. / Irene, Bridget.

Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research. ed. / Shumaila Yousafzai; Alain Fayolle; Adam Lindgreen; Colette Henry; Saadat Saeed; Shandana Sheikh. Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 2018. p. 90-106 (Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Irene, B 2018, Women entrepreneurs in South Africa: Maintaining a balance between culture, personal life, and business. in S Yousafzai, A Fayolle, A Lindgreen, C Henry, S Saeed & S Sheikh (eds), Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research. Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., pp. 90-106. https://doi.org/10.4337/9781786434500.00016
Irene B. Women entrepreneurs in South Africa: Maintaining a balance between culture, personal life, and business. In Yousafzai S, Fayolle A, Lindgreen A, Henry C, Saeed S, Sheikh S, editors, Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research. Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. 2018. p. 90-106. (Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research). https://doi.org/10.4337/9781786434500.00016
Irene, Bridget. / Women entrepreneurs in South Africa: Maintaining a balance between culture, personal life, and business. Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research. editor / Shumaila Yousafzai ; Alain Fayolle ; Adam Lindgreen ; Colette Henry ; Saadat Saeed ; Shandana Sheikh. Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 2018. pp. 90-106 (Women Entrepreneurs and the Myth of 'Underperformance': A New Look at Women's Entrepreneurship Research).
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