With Flying Colours: Pilot Performance with Colour-Coded Head-Up Flight Symbology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The manipulation of colour in display symbology design has long been recognised as a method to improve operator experience and performance. Recent developments in colour head-up display (HUD) and helmet-mounted display (HMD) technology underline the necessity to understand the human factors considerations of symbology colour coding against conventional monochrome symbology formats. In this low-fidelity desktop human-in-the-loop experiment, the colour of flight symbology on an overlaid symbology set was coded as a redundant cue to indicate the accuracy of professional and non-professional pilots’ flight profile across a range of simulated flight manoeuvres. The main finding of this study was that colour coding flight symbology supported the manual flying performance of both professional and non-professional pilots. Notably, colour-coding of the bank indicator and airspeed tape minimised performance error during turning and altitude change manoeuvres, respectively. The usability of colour coded symbology was also rated higher than the monochrome symbology. We conclude that colour coded HUD/HMD symbology is preferred by the user and may improve performance during low workload manual flying tasks. A fuller understanding of performance and workload effects will require future studies to employ higher workload flying tasks and examine the utility of colour coding within higher fidelity environments.
Original languageEnglish
Article number101932
Pages (from-to)(In-press)
Number of pages12
JournalDisplays
Volume61
Early online date25 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 25 Nov 2019

Fingerprint

Color
Helmet mounted displays
Display devices
Human engineering
Tapes
Experiments

Funder

Innovate UK

Keywords

  • Head-Up-Displays
  • Head-Mounted-Displays
  • Colour
  • Aviation
  • Performance

Cite this

With Flying Colours: Pilot Performance with Colour-Coded Head-Up Flight Symbology. / Blundell, James; Scott, Steve; Harris, Donald; Huddlestone, John; Richards, Dale.

In: Displays, Vol. 61, 101932, 01.2020, p. (In-press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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