Whose Business is it Anyway: Children and Corporate Social Responsibility in the International Business Agenda

A. Berlan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
35 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Children's rights in business have become a controversial topic in the public arena where cases of child labour in the supply chain tend to dominate discussions. This review takes a wider perspective on children as producers, consumers, stakeholders and generally agents in, rather than passive recipients of, business processes. It eschews questions surrounding the ethics of the international business agenda as regards children in order to focus on the child's right to expression and to be heard. This, it is argued, is a much more neglected debate which, if better understood and more widely acted upon, would drive forward policy action as regards children's rights in business. Publisher Statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Berlan, A 2016, 'Whose Business is it Anyway: Children and Corporate Social Responsibility in the International Business Agenda' Children & Society, vol 30, no. 2, pp. 159–168, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/chso.12149. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159–168
JournalChildren & Society
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Social Responsibility
social responsibility
children's rights
child labor
Business Ethics
producer
recipient
moral philosophy
stakeholder
supply

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Berlan, A 2016, 'Whose Business is it Anyway: Children and Corporate Social Responsibility in the International Business Agenda' Children & Society, vol 30, no. 2, pp. 159–168, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/chso.12149. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Keywords

  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Children's Rights
  • International Business
  • Children's right to expression

Cite this

Whose Business is it Anyway: Children and Corporate Social Responsibility in the International Business Agenda. / Berlan, A.

In: Children & Society, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2016, p. 159–168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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