What do we know about the attitudes, experiences and needs of Black and minority ethnic carers of people with dementia in the United Kingdom? A systematic review of empirical research findings

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    Abstract

    This paper reviews recent literature on the experiences, attitudes and needs of caring for someone with dementia in Black and minority ethnic communities in the United Kingdom. Eight articles, which investigated carer experiences from Black and minority ethnic communities when caring for someone with dementia, were critically appraised. All eight studies used a qualitative methodology. The review identified several themes and issues across the qualitative studies. These included memory loss being viewed as a normal process of ageing, care being perceived as an extension of an existing responsibility, a poor understanding of what support services provide, the influence of migration, the impact of stigma and increased female responsibility. Methodological limitations of the research literature studies are also highlighted and clinically relevant implications are discussed, alongside recommendations for future research in this area.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)721-742
    JournalDementia
    Volume15
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 22 May 2014

    Bibliographical note

    This article is still in print. Full citation details will be uploaded when available.

    Keywords

    • black
    • ethnic
    • carer
    • dementia
    • minority

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