What are the most effective techniques for self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour – and are they the same?

Stefanie Williams, D.P. French

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    Background: There is convincing evidence that targeting self-efficacy is an effective means of increasing physical activity. However, evidence concerning which are the most effective techniques for changing self-efficacy and thereby physical activity is lacking. The present research aimed to compare the effects of specific intervention techniques used in physical activity interventions, on changes in both self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour. Methods: A systematic literature search of three databases yielded 16 distinct physical activity intervention studies for ‘healthy’ adults that measured changes in both self-efficacy and physical activity. Intervention descriptions were coded using an updated version of a standardised taxonomy to classify behaviour change techniques (Abraham & Michie, 2008). Meta-analysis, with moderator analyses, was conducted to examine the association of changes in self-efficacy, and physical activity, according to whether or not specific intervention techniques were included. Findings: A significant (p
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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    Self Efficacy
    Exercise
    Meta-Analysis
    Databases
    Research

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of this item is not available from the repository. Paper presented at the 2010 British Psychological Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, held 15-17 September 2010, Belfast. The research from this conference presentation was later developed into a full-length journal article - see the link below. Please note Stephanie Williams was using the surname Ashford at the time of presentation.

    Keywords

    • self-efficacy
    • exercise
    • physical activity
    • behaviour change
    • health psychology
    • systematic review

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Background: There is convincing evidence that targeting self-efficacy is an effective means of increasing physical activity. However, evidence concerning which are the most effective techniques for changing self-efficacy and thereby physical activity is lacking. The present research aimed to compare the effects of specific intervention techniques used in physical activity interventions, on changes in both self-efficacy and physical activity behaviour. Methods: A systematic literature search of three databases yielded 16 distinct physical activity intervention studies for ‘healthy’ adults that measured changes in both self-efficacy and physical activity. Intervention descriptions were coded using an updated version of a standardised taxonomy to classify behaviour change techniques (Abraham & Michie, 2008). Meta-analysis, with moderator analyses, was conducted to examine the association of changes in self-efficacy, and physical activity, according to whether or not specific intervention techniques were included. Findings: A significant (p",
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