Weight loss in a UK commercial all meal provision study: A randomised controlled trial

Duane Mellor, C. Whitham, S. Goodwin, Martyn Morris, M. Reid, S. L. Atkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Effective approaches are needed to address the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity. The present study investigated whether all meal provision was a more effective and acceptable method for weight loss than a self-directed diet. Methods: This randomised controlled trial recruited 112 men and women with a body mass index in the range 27-35 kg m-2, who had no comorbidities, from the local area of Hull. Participants were randomised to receive either meal provision or follow a self-directed diet for a 12-week period that resulted in an estimated 2928 kJ day-1 (700 kcal day-1) deficit. A dietitian supervised both dietary interventions. Results: At 12 weeks [mean (SEM)], percentage weight loss in the meal provision group was 6.6% (0.5%) compared to 4.3% (0.6%) for those on the self-directed diet. In terms of clinically relevant weight loss, 61% of participants lost 5% or more of their body weight with meal provision compared to 22% on the self-directed diet (P < 0.001). Weight loss was associated with wellbeing in both groups. Attrition was less apparent with 7% of those participants receiving meal provision withdrawing from the study compared to 41% of those following the self-directed diet (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Meal provision was a more effective and accepted method for weight loss over a 12-week period compared to a self-directed diet. This may in part represent the difference between being given the meal provision food free of charge. However, longer-term maintenance studies need to be undertaken to ascertain their effects on the maintenance of weight loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-383
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

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Meals
Weight Loss
Randomized Controlled Trials
Diet
Nutritionists
Comorbidity
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Body Weight
Maintenance
Food

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Meal provision
  • Meal replacement
  • Obesity
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Weight loss in a UK commercial all meal provision study : A randomised controlled trial. / Mellor, Duane; Whitham, C.; Goodwin, S.; Morris, Martyn; Reid, M.; Atkin, S. L.

In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 27, No. 4, 08.2014, p. 377-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mellor, D, Whitham, C, Goodwin, S, Morris, M, Reid, M & Atkin, SL 2014, 'Weight loss in a UK commercial all meal provision study: A randomised controlled trial' Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 377-383. https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12171
Mellor, Duane ; Whitham, C. ; Goodwin, S. ; Morris, Martyn ; Reid, M. ; Atkin, S. L. / Weight loss in a UK commercial all meal provision study : A randomised controlled trial. In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 377-383.
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