Wartime Captivity and Homecoming: Culture, Stigma and Coping Strategies of Formerly Abducted Women in Post-conflict Northern Uganda

Allen Kiconco, Martin Nthakomwa

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)
    97 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    One of the three durable solutions to mass displacement preferred by leading agencies is that survivors return to their home communities. It is believed that families and communities provide the best hope for recovery and reintegration owing to familiarity, care, and shared culture. Yet, these ‘places of hope and comfort’ can also be, potentially, a hostile environment in which stigma can flourish. Women who were abducted by the Lord's Resistance Army in northern Uganda find that achieving meaningful reintegration into their communities is a distant prospect despite being the home culture they once shared. The stigmatisation of formerly abducted persons by home community members who have never been abducted renders them ‘outsiders’ upon return. Meaningful relationships with fellow community members and access to cultural, social, and economic systems are hampered by the women's traumatic past. This experience has significant implications for these women, negotiating their journey to recovery and reintegration into home communities.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)654-676
    Number of pages23
    JournalDisasters
    Volume46
    Issue number3
    Early online date28 Jul 2021
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2022

    Bibliographical note

    © 2021 The Authors. Disasters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Overseas Development Institute.This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    Keywords

    • Acholi
    • Lord's Resistance Army (LRA)
    • Uganda
    • conflict
    • gender
    • girls
    • recovery
    • reintegration
    • stigma

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences(all)
    • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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