Value of blended learning in university and the workplace: Some experiences of university students

Colm Fearon, Simon Starr, Heather McLaughlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore student views of blended learning in a university setting based on the use of audio lectures, seminars, discussion boards and wikis. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 14 seminar (focus) groups consisting of approximately 20 students each, over a two year period, provided qualitative views of how students believed blended learning would be useful for their degree and future careers. Findings: Students found the blended learning approach very flexible and preferable in many cases to traditional face-to-face learning. Key themes in terms of emerging benefit themes included: flexibility and support; motivation and sharing ideas; class interaction and explanation of ideas; better than pure eLearning; communicating and teamwork; developing project leadership skills. Research implications/limitations: This exploratory study of university students is important because they are aware of the value of blended learning and transferable skills for the workplace. The research is limited because it is qualitative, yet it still provides a useful insight into the benefits and value of blended learning from the student perspective. Originality/value: There is a paucity of qualitative research on the benefits of blended learning and this paper examines the value of the overall approach for university students and the workplace.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)446-450
Number of pages5
JournalIndustrial and Commercial Training
Volume43
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blended Learning
workplace
university
Values
experience
student
teamwork
Work place
Blended learning
qualitative research
flexibility
career
leadership
methodology
interaction
learning

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Learning
  • Students
  • Teaching methods
  • Universities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Value of blended learning in university and the workplace : Some experiences of university students. / Fearon, Colm; Starr, Simon; McLaughlin, Heather.

In: Industrial and Commercial Training, Vol. 43, No. 7, 10.2011, p. 446-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7b7e1f72f452400a9a3e718e9939222c,
title = "Value of blended learning in university and the workplace: Some experiences of university students",
abstract = "Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore student views of blended learning in a university setting based on the use of audio lectures, seminars, discussion boards and wikis. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 14 seminar (focus) groups consisting of approximately 20 students each, over a two year period, provided qualitative views of how students believed blended learning would be useful for their degree and future careers. Findings: Students found the blended learning approach very flexible and preferable in many cases to traditional face-to-face learning. Key themes in terms of emerging benefit themes included: flexibility and support; motivation and sharing ideas; class interaction and explanation of ideas; better than pure eLearning; communicating and teamwork; developing project leadership skills. Research implications/limitations: This exploratory study of university students is important because they are aware of the value of blended learning and transferable skills for the workplace. The research is limited because it is qualitative, yet it still provides a useful insight into the benefits and value of blended learning from the student perspective. Originality/value: There is a paucity of qualitative research on the benefits of blended learning and this paper examines the value of the overall approach for university students and the workplace.",
keywords = "Attitudes, Learning, Students, Teaching methods, Universities",
author = "Colm Fearon and Simon Starr and Heather McLaughlin",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1108/00197851111171872",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "446--450",
journal = "Industrial and Commercial Training",
issn = "0019-7858",
publisher = "Emerald",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Value of blended learning in university and the workplace

T2 - Some experiences of university students

AU - Fearon, Colm

AU - Starr, Simon

AU - McLaughlin, Heather

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore student views of blended learning in a university setting based on the use of audio lectures, seminars, discussion boards and wikis. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 14 seminar (focus) groups consisting of approximately 20 students each, over a two year period, provided qualitative views of how students believed blended learning would be useful for their degree and future careers. Findings: Students found the blended learning approach very flexible and preferable in many cases to traditional face-to-face learning. Key themes in terms of emerging benefit themes included: flexibility and support; motivation and sharing ideas; class interaction and explanation of ideas; better than pure eLearning; communicating and teamwork; developing project leadership skills. Research implications/limitations: This exploratory study of university students is important because they are aware of the value of blended learning and transferable skills for the workplace. The research is limited because it is qualitative, yet it still provides a useful insight into the benefits and value of blended learning from the student perspective. Originality/value: There is a paucity of qualitative research on the benefits of blended learning and this paper examines the value of the overall approach for university students and the workplace.

AB - Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore student views of blended learning in a university setting based on the use of audio lectures, seminars, discussion boards and wikis. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 14 seminar (focus) groups consisting of approximately 20 students each, over a two year period, provided qualitative views of how students believed blended learning would be useful for their degree and future careers. Findings: Students found the blended learning approach very flexible and preferable in many cases to traditional face-to-face learning. Key themes in terms of emerging benefit themes included: flexibility and support; motivation and sharing ideas; class interaction and explanation of ideas; better than pure eLearning; communicating and teamwork; developing project leadership skills. Research implications/limitations: This exploratory study of university students is important because they are aware of the value of blended learning and transferable skills for the workplace. The research is limited because it is qualitative, yet it still provides a useful insight into the benefits and value of blended learning from the student perspective. Originality/value: There is a paucity of qualitative research on the benefits of blended learning and this paper examines the value of the overall approach for university students and the workplace.

KW - Attitudes

KW - Learning

KW - Students

KW - Teaching methods

KW - Universities

U2 - 10.1108/00197851111171872

DO - 10.1108/00197851111171872

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 446

EP - 450

JO - Industrial and Commercial Training

JF - Industrial and Commercial Training

SN - 0019-7858

IS - 7

ER -