Unpacking the impact of attachment to project teams on boundary-spanning behaviors

Sujin Lee, Sukanlaya Sawang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
51 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

As business environments become even more competitive, project teams are required to make an effort to operate external linkages from within an organization or across organizational boundaries. Nevertheless, some members boundary-span less extensively, isolating themselves and their project teams from external environments. Our study examines why some members boundary-span more or less through the framework of group attachment theory. Data from 521 project-team members in construction and engineering industries revealed that the more individuals worry about their project team's acceptance (group attachment anxiety), the more likely they are to perceive intergroup competition, and thus put more efforts into operating external linkages and resources to help their own teams outperform competitors. In contrast, a tendency to distrust their project teams (group attachment avoidance) generates members' negative construal of their team's external image, and thus fewer efforts are made at operating external linkages. Thus, project leaders and members with high group-attachment-anxiety may be best qualified for external tasks.

Publisher Statement: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Journal of Project Management. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Project Management, [34, 3, (2016)] DOI: 10.1016/j.ijproman.2015.12.003

© 2016, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)444-451
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Project Management
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Project management
Quality control
Industry
Project teams
Boundary spanning
External linkages
Anxiety

Bibliographical note

NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Journal of Project Management. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Project Management, [34, 3, (2016)] DOI: 10.1016/j.ijproman.2015.12.003

© 2016, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

  • boundary spanning
  • project team perception
  • project team attachment

Cite this

Unpacking the impact of attachment to project teams on boundary-spanning behaviors. / Lee, Sujin; Sawang, Sukanlaya.

In: International Journal of Project Management, Vol. 34, No. 3, 2016, p. 444-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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