Understanding the factors that predict victim retraction in police reported allegations of intimate partner violence

Emma Sleath, L. L. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
38 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective A large number of victims of intimate partner violence (IPV), who report their victimisation to the police, subsequently either retract or disengage from the police investigation. Given that we have a very limited understanding of victim retraction/disengagement in IPV cases, this study addresses this gap by identifying the victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that predict retraction/disengagement. Method Five hundred and twenty-four cases of police reported IPV were analysed to examine victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that may predict retraction or disengagement as well as examining the reasons given for retracting/disengaging from the police investigation. Results The results indicated a high level of retraction or disengagement from police investigations. Victim and perpetrator characteristics did not predict retraction or disengagement; however, in comparison with cases where the victims maintain engagement with the case, a number of offence related characteristics (e.g., risk assessment level) did predict retraction and disengagement. Conclusions Victim retraction and disengagement is a significant issue in the successful prosecution of IPV cases, and the findings suggest that certain offence related characteristics increase the likelihood of victim retraction/disengagement.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychology of Violence
Volume(In Press)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

disengagement
Police
police
violence
offense
Crime Victims
Intimate Partner Violence
prosecution
victimization
risk assessment

Bibliographical note

This article is currently in press. Full citation details will be uploaded when available.
This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

Keywords

  • Retraction
  • Withdrawal
  • Victim
  • Domestic Violence
  • Police

Cite this

Understanding the factors that predict victim retraction in police reported allegations of intimate partner violence. / Sleath, Emma; Smith, L. L.

In: Psychology of Violence, Vol. (In Press), 25.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective A large number of victims of intimate partner violence (IPV), who report their victimisation to the police, subsequently either retract or disengage from the police investigation. Given that we have a very limited understanding of victim retraction/disengagement in IPV cases, this study addresses this gap by identifying the victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that predict retraction/disengagement. Method Five hundred and twenty-four cases of police reported IPV were analysed to examine victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that may predict retraction or disengagement as well as examining the reasons given for retracting/disengaging from the police investigation. Results The results indicated a high level of retraction or disengagement from police investigations. Victim and perpetrator characteristics did not predict retraction or disengagement; however, in comparison with cases where the victims maintain engagement with the case, a number of offence related characteristics (e.g., risk assessment level) did predict retraction and disengagement. Conclusions Victim retraction and disengagement is a significant issue in the successful prosecution of IPV cases, and the findings suggest that certain offence related characteristics increase the likelihood of victim retraction/disengagement.",
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N2 - Objective A large number of victims of intimate partner violence (IPV), who report their victimisation to the police, subsequently either retract or disengage from the police investigation. Given that we have a very limited understanding of victim retraction/disengagement in IPV cases, this study addresses this gap by identifying the victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that predict retraction/disengagement. Method Five hundred and twenty-four cases of police reported IPV were analysed to examine victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that may predict retraction or disengagement as well as examining the reasons given for retracting/disengaging from the police investigation. Results The results indicated a high level of retraction or disengagement from police investigations. Victim and perpetrator characteristics did not predict retraction or disengagement; however, in comparison with cases where the victims maintain engagement with the case, a number of offence related characteristics (e.g., risk assessment level) did predict retraction and disengagement. Conclusions Victim retraction and disengagement is a significant issue in the successful prosecution of IPV cases, and the findings suggest that certain offence related characteristics increase the likelihood of victim retraction/disengagement.

AB - Objective A large number of victims of intimate partner violence (IPV), who report their victimisation to the police, subsequently either retract or disengage from the police investigation. Given that we have a very limited understanding of victim retraction/disengagement in IPV cases, this study addresses this gap by identifying the victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that predict retraction/disengagement. Method Five hundred and twenty-four cases of police reported IPV were analysed to examine victim, perpetrator, and offence characteristics that may predict retraction or disengagement as well as examining the reasons given for retracting/disengaging from the police investigation. Results The results indicated a high level of retraction or disengagement from police investigations. Victim and perpetrator characteristics did not predict retraction or disengagement; however, in comparison with cases where the victims maintain engagement with the case, a number of offence related characteristics (e.g., risk assessment level) did predict retraction and disengagement. Conclusions Victim retraction and disengagement is a significant issue in the successful prosecution of IPV cases, and the findings suggest that certain offence related characteristics increase the likelihood of victim retraction/disengagement.

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