Understanding students' perspectives on the use of virtual worlds in higher education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Virtual worlds have received significant attention in educational technology as teaching and learning spaces, yet this focus has yielded only limited analysis of students’ perspectives on the use of virtual worlds in education and, in consequence, a potentially restricted view. A qualitative inductive approach was adopted to investigate the experiences and perspectives of students at four UK university research sites where a virtual world was being used in teaching and learning. Three concepts were identified as being highly influential in students’ perspectives: discipline, education systems, and digital games. Through exploring these concepts we examined how virtual worlds were socially constructed, sustained, situated, and embedded in other networks of meaning in students’ lives. Students’ preexisting meaning frameworks shaped their perspectives and approaches to specific action, such as ownership of space and spatial practice. The consequences for theorising students’ perspectives and pedagogic design are discussed with particular reference to the need for better appreciation of the socially situated location of educational technologies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(in press)
JournalJournal of Computing in Higher Education
Volume(In Press)
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Feb 2016

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education
student
educational technology
Teaching
education system
university
learning
experience

Bibliographical note

This article is currently in press. Full citation details will be uploaded when available.

Keywords

  • Virtual Worlds
  • Second Life
  • Students’ experiences
  • Students’ perspectives
  • Qualitative

Cite this

Understanding students' perspectives on the use of virtual worlds in higher education. / Mawer, M.; Wimpenny, Katherine.

In: Journal of Computing in Higher Education, Vol. (In Press), 02.2016, p. (in press).

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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