Understanding capacity fade in silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries using three electrode cells and upper cut-off voltage studies

Shane D. Beattie, M.J. Loveridge, Michael J. Lain, Stefania Ferrari, Bryant J. Polzin, Rohit Bhagat, R. Dashwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)
18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Commercial Li-ion batteries are typically cycled between 3.0 and 4.2 V. These voltages limits are chosen based on the characteristics of the cathode (e.g. lithium cobalt oxide) and anode (e.g. graphite). When alternative anode/cathode chemistries are studied the same cut-off voltages are often, mistakenly, used. Silicon (Si) based anodes are widely studied as a high capacity alternative to graphite for Lithium-ion batteries. When silicon-based anodes are paired with high capacity cathodes (e.g. Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminium Oxide; NCA) the cell typically suffers from rapid capacity fade. The purpose of this communication is to understand how the choice of upper cut-off voltage affects cell performance in Si/NCA cells. A careful study of three-electrode cell data will show that capacity fade in Si/NCA cells is due to an ever-evolving silicon voltage profile that pushes the upper voltage at the cathode to >4.4 V (vs. Li/Li+). This behaviour initially improves cycle efficiency, due to liberation of new lithium, but ultimately reduces cycling efficiency, resulting in rapid capacity fade.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)426-430
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Power Sources
Volume302
Early online date11 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Silicon
electric batteries
cut-off
lithium
Anodes
Cathodes
anodes
Electrodes
cathodes
electrodes
Electric potential
electric potential
silicon
cells
Lithium
cobalt oxides
Graphite
ions
Cobalt
graphite

Keywords

  • Voltage
  • Capacity
  • Silicon
  • Cathode
  • Amorphous

Cite this

Understanding capacity fade in silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries using three electrode cells and upper cut-off voltage studies. / Beattie, Shane D.; Loveridge, M.J.; Lain, Michael J.; Ferrari, Stefania; Polzin, Bryant J.; Bhagat, Rohit; Dashwood, R.

In: Journal of Power Sources, Vol. 302, 20.01.2016, p. 426-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beattie, Shane D. ; Loveridge, M.J. ; Lain, Michael J. ; Ferrari, Stefania ; Polzin, Bryant J. ; Bhagat, Rohit ; Dashwood, R. / Understanding capacity fade in silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries using three electrode cells and upper cut-off voltage studies. In: Journal of Power Sources. 2016 ; Vol. 302. pp. 426-430.
@article{7d647765fc674e74b63f3292589d6168,
title = "Understanding capacity fade in silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries using three electrode cells and upper cut-off voltage studies",
abstract = "Commercial Li-ion batteries are typically cycled between 3.0 and 4.2 V. These voltages limits are chosen based on the characteristics of the cathode (e.g. lithium cobalt oxide) and anode (e.g. graphite). When alternative anode/cathode chemistries are studied the same cut-off voltages are often, mistakenly, used. Silicon (Si) based anodes are widely studied as a high capacity alternative to graphite for Lithium-ion batteries. When silicon-based anodes are paired with high capacity cathodes (e.g. Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminium Oxide; NCA) the cell typically suffers from rapid capacity fade. The purpose of this communication is to understand how the choice of upper cut-off voltage affects cell performance in Si/NCA cells. A careful study of three-electrode cell data will show that capacity fade in Si/NCA cells is due to an ever-evolving silicon voltage profile that pushes the upper voltage at the cathode to >4.4 V (vs. Li/Li+). This behaviour initially improves cycle efficiency, due to liberation of new lithium, but ultimately reduces cycling efficiency, resulting in rapid capacity fade.",
keywords = "Voltage, Capacity, Silicon, Cathode, Amorphous",
author = "Beattie, {Shane D.} and M.J. Loveridge and Lain, {Michael J.} and Stefania Ferrari and Polzin, {Bryant J.} and Rohit Bhagat and R. Dashwood",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpowsour.2015.10.066",
language = "English",
volume = "302",
pages = "426--430",
journal = "Journal of Power Sources",
issn = "0378-7753",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding capacity fade in silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries using three electrode cells and upper cut-off voltage studies

AU - Beattie, Shane D.

AU - Loveridge, M.J.

AU - Lain, Michael J.

AU - Ferrari, Stefania

AU - Polzin, Bryant J.

AU - Bhagat, Rohit

AU - Dashwood, R.

PY - 2016/1/20

Y1 - 2016/1/20

N2 - Commercial Li-ion batteries are typically cycled between 3.0 and 4.2 V. These voltages limits are chosen based on the characteristics of the cathode (e.g. lithium cobalt oxide) and anode (e.g. graphite). When alternative anode/cathode chemistries are studied the same cut-off voltages are often, mistakenly, used. Silicon (Si) based anodes are widely studied as a high capacity alternative to graphite for Lithium-ion batteries. When silicon-based anodes are paired with high capacity cathodes (e.g. Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminium Oxide; NCA) the cell typically suffers from rapid capacity fade. The purpose of this communication is to understand how the choice of upper cut-off voltage affects cell performance in Si/NCA cells. A careful study of three-electrode cell data will show that capacity fade in Si/NCA cells is due to an ever-evolving silicon voltage profile that pushes the upper voltage at the cathode to >4.4 V (vs. Li/Li+). This behaviour initially improves cycle efficiency, due to liberation of new lithium, but ultimately reduces cycling efficiency, resulting in rapid capacity fade.

AB - Commercial Li-ion batteries are typically cycled between 3.0 and 4.2 V. These voltages limits are chosen based on the characteristics of the cathode (e.g. lithium cobalt oxide) and anode (e.g. graphite). When alternative anode/cathode chemistries are studied the same cut-off voltages are often, mistakenly, used. Silicon (Si) based anodes are widely studied as a high capacity alternative to graphite for Lithium-ion batteries. When silicon-based anodes are paired with high capacity cathodes (e.g. Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminium Oxide; NCA) the cell typically suffers from rapid capacity fade. The purpose of this communication is to understand how the choice of upper cut-off voltage affects cell performance in Si/NCA cells. A careful study of three-electrode cell data will show that capacity fade in Si/NCA cells is due to an ever-evolving silicon voltage profile that pushes the upper voltage at the cathode to >4.4 V (vs. Li/Li+). This behaviour initially improves cycle efficiency, due to liberation of new lithium, but ultimately reduces cycling efficiency, resulting in rapid capacity fade.

KW - Voltage

KW - Capacity

KW - Silicon

KW - Cathode

KW - Amorphous

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2015.10.066

DO - 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2015.10.066

M3 - Article

VL - 302

SP - 426

EP - 430

JO - Journal of Power Sources

JF - Journal of Power Sources

SN - 0378-7753

ER -