Trying similarity, doing difference: the role of interviewer self-disclosure in interview talk with young people

Jackie Abell, Abigail Locke, Susan Condor, Stephen Gibson, Clifford Stevenson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Advocates of semi-structured interview techniques have often argued that rapport may be built, and power inequalities between interviewer and respondent counteracted, by strategic self-disclosure on the part of the interviewer. Strategies that use self-disclosure to construct similarity between interviewer and respondent rely on the presumption that the respondent will in fact interpret the interviewer's behaviour in this way. In this article we examine the role of interviewer self-disclosure using data drawn from three projects involving interviews with young people. We consider how an interviewer's attempts to ‘do similarity’ may be interpreted variously as displays of similarity or, ironically, as indicators of difference by the participant, and map the implications that this may have for subsequent interview dialogue. A particular object of concern relates to the ways in which self-disclosing acts may function in the negotiation of category entitlement within interview interactions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)221-244
    Number of pages24
    JournalQualitative Research
    Volume6
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2006

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    Self Disclosure
    Interviews
    interview
    Self-disclosure
    Negotiating
    dialogue

    Keywords

    • qualitative
    • semi-structured interviews
    • rapport
    • difference
    • similarity
    • interaction
    • interviewing technique

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychology(all)
    • Social Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Trying similarity, doing difference: the role of interviewer self-disclosure in interview talk with young people. / Abell, Jackie; Locke, Abigail; Condor, Susan; Gibson, Stephen; Stevenson, Clifford.

    In: Qualitative Research, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.05.2006, p. 221-244.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abell, Jackie ; Locke, Abigail ; Condor, Susan ; Gibson, Stephen ; Stevenson, Clifford. / Trying similarity, doing difference: the role of interviewer self-disclosure in interview talk with young people. In: Qualitative Research. 2006 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 221-244.
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