Transdisciplinary Research as a Means of Protecting Human Health, Ecosystems and Climate by Engaging People to Act on Air Pollution

Patrick Büker, Sarah E. West, Cressida J. Bowyer, William Apondo, Steve Cinderby, Cindy M. Gray, Matthew Hahn, Fiona Lambe, Miranda Loh, Alexander J. Medcalf, Cassilde Muhoza, Kanyiva Muindi, Timothy Kamau Njoora, Marsailidh M. Twigg, Charlotte Waelde, Anna Walnycki, Megan Wainwright, Jana Wendler, Mike Wilson, Heather D. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Air pollution harms the health of humans, nature and wildlife, agricultural crops and livestock and climate. As a result, it hinders the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals 3 (Good Health and Wellbeing), 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy), 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) and 13 (Climate Change). In order to improve human and (agro-)ecosystem health, One Health approaches for better air quality must account for local knowledge, cultural practices and priorities. People with lower socio-economic status often have limited awareness of air pollution yet are affected most through personal exposure and increased food prices. This case trialled a new, co-created transdisciplinary approach to air pollution awareness raising in the Mukuru community in Nairobi, Kenya. The pilot study used interviews, storytelling, participatory mapping, theatre, playful activities and music with the aim of discovering affected communities’ perceptions of air pollution, increasing understanding and empowering people to demand that policy makers develop and implement effective, inclusive air pollution abatement policies. Information © The Authors 2024
Original languageEnglish
JournalOne Health Cases
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Feb 2024

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