Toxicity and bioavailability of atrazine and molinate to the freshwater fish (Melanotenia fluviatilis) under laboratory and simulated field conditions

Yin Latt Phyu, M. St J. Warne, R. P. Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute (96 h) semi-static toxicity tests were conducted by exposing the freshwater fish, Melanotenia fluviatilis, to atrazine and molinate in laboratory and river water both with and without sediment. The 96-h EC50 (imbalance) values of atrazine to M. fluviatilis ranged from 5.6 to 10.4 mg L-1 while the corresponding values for molinate ranged from 7.9 to 14.8 mg L -1, respectively. Atrazine was classed as having moderate toxicity while molinate had low to moderate toxicity to M. fluviatilis. Neither the presence of river water nor sediment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bioavailability of either herbicide to M. fluviatilis. A series of other studies by the authors have found that sediment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bioavailability of these two chemicals to a variety of organisms. Reasons for sediment having no effect for this species were examined. This lack of effect by sediment is most likely due to the relative rates of absorption into the fish and adsorption onto the sediment. However, contributions to this outcome by resuspended sediment, contaminated food and a combined effect of the herbicides and sediment could not be excluded.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-99
Number of pages14
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume356
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atrazine
Herbicides
atrazine
Fish
bioavailability
Toxicity
Sediments
toxicity
fish
sediment
river water
herbicide
Rivers
molinate
Biological Availability
laboratory
Water
toxicity test
adsorption
Adsorption

Keywords

  • Atrazine
  • Bioavailability
  • EC50
  • Fish
  • Herbicide
  • Molinate
  • River water
  • Toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

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abstract = "Acute (96 h) semi-static toxicity tests were conducted by exposing the freshwater fish, Melanotenia fluviatilis, to atrazine and molinate in laboratory and river water both with and without sediment. The 96-h EC50 (imbalance) values of atrazine to M. fluviatilis ranged from 5.6 to 10.4 mg L-1 while the corresponding values for molinate ranged from 7.9 to 14.8 mg L -1, respectively. Atrazine was classed as having moderate toxicity while molinate had low to moderate toxicity to M. fluviatilis. Neither the presence of river water nor sediment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bioavailability of either herbicide to M. fluviatilis. A series of other studies by the authors have found that sediment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bioavailability of these two chemicals to a variety of organisms. Reasons for sediment having no effect for this species were examined. This lack of effect by sediment is most likely due to the relative rates of absorption into the fish and adsorption onto the sediment. However, contributions to this outcome by resuspended sediment, contaminated food and a combined effect of the herbicides and sediment could not be excluded.",
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AU - Warne, M. St J.

AU - Lim, R. P.

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AB - Acute (96 h) semi-static toxicity tests were conducted by exposing the freshwater fish, Melanotenia fluviatilis, to atrazine and molinate in laboratory and river water both with and without sediment. The 96-h EC50 (imbalance) values of atrazine to M. fluviatilis ranged from 5.6 to 10.4 mg L-1 while the corresponding values for molinate ranged from 7.9 to 14.8 mg L -1, respectively. Atrazine was classed as having moderate toxicity while molinate had low to moderate toxicity to M. fluviatilis. Neither the presence of river water nor sediment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bioavailability of either herbicide to M. fluviatilis. A series of other studies by the authors have found that sediment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bioavailability of these two chemicals to a variety of organisms. Reasons for sediment having no effect for this species were examined. This lack of effect by sediment is most likely due to the relative rates of absorption into the fish and adsorption onto the sediment. However, contributions to this outcome by resuspended sediment, contaminated food and a combined effect of the herbicides and sediment could not be excluded.

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