Towards the Classification of Fireground Cues: A Qualitative Analysis of Expert Reports

Justin Okoli, John Watt, Gordon Weller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

While there is evidence linking informational cue processing ability to effective decision-making on the fireground, only a few studies have actually attempted detailed description and categorization of the cues sought by fireground commanders when managing real fires. In this study, thirty experienced firefighters were interviewed across various fire stations in the UK and Nigeria using the critical decision method protocol. Forty-one different cues were identified, which were then categorized into five distinct types, namely safety cues, cues that indicate the nature of problem, environmental cues, emotive cues and incident command and control cues. The article concluded by evaluating the role of expertise in cue utilization, drawing on evidence from the naturalistic decision-making (NDM) literature. Publisher Statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Okoli, J, Watt, J & Weller, G 2017, 'Towards the Classification of Fireground Cues: A Qualitative Analysis of Expert Reports' Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, vol 25, no. 4, pp. 197-208, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12129. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-208
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Contingencies and Crisis Management
Volume25
Issue number4
Early online date15 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

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qualitative analysis
Fires
Decision making
decision making
crisis management
environmental cue
safety
Processing
Qualitative analysis
decision
protocol
method
station
Nigeria
Safety
Peers
Expertise
Contingency
Naturalistic decision making
Incidents

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Okoli, J, Watt, J & Weller, G 2017, 'Towards the Classification of Fireground Cues: A Qualitative Analysis of Expert Reports' Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, vol 25, no. 4, pp. 197-208, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-5973.12129. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Cite this

Towards the Classification of Fireground Cues : A Qualitative Analysis of Expert Reports. / Okoli, Justin; Watt, John; Weller, Gordon.

In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, Vol. 25, No. 4, 12.2017, p. 197-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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