Tonnage Tax: Is it Working

Heather McLaughlin, James McConville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The introduction of the tonnage tax for shipping companies has been a response to the declining fleets in many European countries. There are strategic and commercial reasons why a maritime presence is desirable, not least of which is to maintain an important skill base. Although regimes have differed they all offer some form of preferential rates of tax for those ships on the register. In certain cases this tax subsidy has been linked to a requirement to train seafarers, notably in the UK. This article analyses the impact of the tonnage tax system and its success in achieving its objectives of fleet expansion and employment with particular reference to the UK.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-186
Number of pages10
JournalMaritime Policy and Management
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Taxation
taxes
tax system
shipping
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Freight transportation
regime
Ships
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Cite this

Tonnage Tax : Is it Working. / McLaughlin, Heather; McConville, James.

In: Maritime Policy and Management, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2005, p. 177-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McLaughlin, H & McConville, J 2005, 'Tonnage Tax: Is it Working' Maritime Policy and Management, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 177-186. https://doi.org/10.1080/03088830500083547
McLaughlin, Heather ; McConville, James. / Tonnage Tax : Is it Working. In: Maritime Policy and Management. 2005 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 177-186.
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