Thermochemical recovery technology for improved modern engine fuel economy – part 1: analysis of a prototype exhaust gas fuel reformer

D. Fennell, Martin Herreros, A. Tsolakis, K. Cockle, J. Pignon, P. Millington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Exhaust gas fuel reforming has the potential to improve the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines, as well as simultaneously reduce gaseous and particulate emissions. This thermochemical energy recovery technique aims to reclaim exhaust energy from the high temperature engine exhaust stream to drive catalytic endothermic fuel reforming reactions; these convert hydrocarbon fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate. The reformate is recycled back to the engine as Reformed Exhaust Gas Recirculation (REGR), which provides a source of hydrogen to enhance the engine combustion process and enable high levels of charge dilution; this process is especially promising for modern gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. This paper presents a full-scale prototype gasoline reformer integrated with a multi-cylinder GDI engine. Performance is assessed in terms of the reformate composition, the temperature distribution across the catalyst, the reforming process (fuel conversion) efficiency and the amount of exhaust heat recovery achieved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35252-35261
JournalRSC Advances
Volume5
Early online date7 Apr 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Gas fuels
Fuel economy
Exhaust gases
Reforming reactions
Engines
Gasoline
Recovery
Direct injection
Hydrogen
Vehicle Emissions
Exhaust gas recirculation
Particulate emissions
Exhaust systems (engine)
Waste heat utilization
Engine cylinders
Hydrocarbons
Internal combustion engines
Gas emissions
Dilution
Conversion efficiency

Cite this

Thermochemical recovery technology for improved modern engine fuel economy – part 1: analysis of a prototype exhaust gas fuel reformer. / Fennell, D.; Herreros, Martin; Tsolakis, A.; Cockle, K.; Pignon, J.; Millington, P.

In: RSC Advances, Vol. 5, 2015, p. 35252-35261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fennell, D. ; Herreros, Martin ; Tsolakis, A. ; Cockle, K. ; Pignon, J. ; Millington, P. / Thermochemical recovery technology for improved modern engine fuel economy – part 1: analysis of a prototype exhaust gas fuel reformer. In: RSC Advances. 2015 ; Vol. 5. pp. 35252-35261.
@article{3a8775beb5eb43dfa4cdba4cd113a294,
title = "Thermochemical recovery technology for improved modern engine fuel economy – part 1: analysis of a prototype exhaust gas fuel reformer",
abstract = "Exhaust gas fuel reforming has the potential to improve the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines, as well as simultaneously reduce gaseous and particulate emissions. This thermochemical energy recovery technique aims to reclaim exhaust energy from the high temperature engine exhaust stream to drive catalytic endothermic fuel reforming reactions; these convert hydrocarbon fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate. The reformate is recycled back to the engine as Reformed Exhaust Gas Recirculation (REGR), which provides a source of hydrogen to enhance the engine combustion process and enable high levels of charge dilution; this process is especially promising for modern gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. This paper presents a full-scale prototype gasoline reformer integrated with a multi-cylinder GDI engine. Performance is assessed in terms of the reformate composition, the temperature distribution across the catalyst, the reforming process (fuel conversion) efficiency and the amount of exhaust heat recovery achieved.",
author = "D. Fennell and Martin Herreros and A. Tsolakis and K. Cockle and J. Pignon and P. Millington",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1039/C5RA03111G",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "35252--35261",
journal = "RSC Advances",
issn = "2046-2069",
publisher = "American Institute of Physics",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thermochemical recovery technology for improved modern engine fuel economy – part 1: analysis of a prototype exhaust gas fuel reformer

AU - Fennell, D.

AU - Herreros, Martin

AU - Tsolakis, A.

AU - Cockle, K.

AU - Pignon, J.

AU - Millington, P.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Exhaust gas fuel reforming has the potential to improve the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines, as well as simultaneously reduce gaseous and particulate emissions. This thermochemical energy recovery technique aims to reclaim exhaust energy from the high temperature engine exhaust stream to drive catalytic endothermic fuel reforming reactions; these convert hydrocarbon fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate. The reformate is recycled back to the engine as Reformed Exhaust Gas Recirculation (REGR), which provides a source of hydrogen to enhance the engine combustion process and enable high levels of charge dilution; this process is especially promising for modern gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. This paper presents a full-scale prototype gasoline reformer integrated with a multi-cylinder GDI engine. Performance is assessed in terms of the reformate composition, the temperature distribution across the catalyst, the reforming process (fuel conversion) efficiency and the amount of exhaust heat recovery achieved.

AB - Exhaust gas fuel reforming has the potential to improve the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines, as well as simultaneously reduce gaseous and particulate emissions. This thermochemical energy recovery technique aims to reclaim exhaust energy from the high temperature engine exhaust stream to drive catalytic endothermic fuel reforming reactions; these convert hydrocarbon fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate. The reformate is recycled back to the engine as Reformed Exhaust Gas Recirculation (REGR), which provides a source of hydrogen to enhance the engine combustion process and enable high levels of charge dilution; this process is especially promising for modern gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. This paper presents a full-scale prototype gasoline reformer integrated with a multi-cylinder GDI engine. Performance is assessed in terms of the reformate composition, the temperature distribution across the catalyst, the reforming process (fuel conversion) efficiency and the amount of exhaust heat recovery achieved.

U2 - 10.1039/C5RA03111G

DO - 10.1039/C5RA03111G

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 35252

EP - 35261

JO - RSC Advances

JF - RSC Advances

SN - 2046-2069

ER -