Thermal Comfort in the UK Higher Educational Buildings: The Influence of Thermal History on Students’ Thermal Comfort

Mina Jowkar, Azadeh Montazami

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Statistics regarding the number of international students in the UK higher educational buildings show an upward trend in the recent years. These students coming from different cultural and climatic backgrounds have various thermal perceptions inside the classrooms. According to the significant influence of thermal quality of learning environments on students’ productivity and wellbeing, it is essential to develop specific environmental guidelines for the UK higher educational buildings based on the students’ backgrounds.
Developed standards not only can provide occupants’ thermal comfort in such multicultural spaces, but also can minimize energy consumption and running costs within the higher educational buildings in this country.
This study evaluated the students’ thermal perception in three different types of learning environments including fifteen Naturally Ventilated lecture rooms, studios and PC Labs from three different buildings of Coventry University. Indoor air temperature, humidity level, air velocity and mean radiant temperature were
monitored in different times of a day. A questionnaire survey was conducted on approximately 1000 undergraduate and postgraduate students at the same time of recording operative temperature. This study is completed based on thermal comfort votes of 650 students. Results reveal the influence of short and long‐term thermal history including climatic background, thermal condition of current accommodation and thermal adaptation to the UK weather on students’ thermal comfort perception inside a classroom. The outcome of this study can be applied to develop the reliable and practical guidelines for the multicultural higher educational buildings within the UK.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - 12 Apr 2018
EventWindsor Conference: Rethinking Thermal Comfort - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Apr 201815 Apr 2018
Conference number: 10
http://windsorconference.com/

Conference

ConferenceWindsor Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period12/04/1815/04/18
Internet address

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Thermal comfort
Students
Hot Temperature
Studios
Air
Temperature
Atmospheric humidity
Energy utilization
Productivity
Statistics

Cite this

Thermal Comfort in the UK Higher Educational Buildings: The Influence of Thermal History on Students’ Thermal Comfort. / Jowkar, Mina; Montazami, Azadeh.

2018. Paper presented at Windsor Conference, London, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Jowkar, M & Montazami, A 2018, 'Thermal Comfort in the UK Higher Educational Buildings: The Influence of Thermal History on Students’ Thermal Comfort' Paper presented at Windsor Conference, London, United Kingdom, 12/04/18 - 15/04/18, .
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