There’s Nothing That Compares to it”: A Grounded Theoretical Analysis of the Experiences of Police Hostage and Crisis Negotiators

Amy Grubb, Sarah Brown, Peter Hall, Erica Bowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose
Hostage and crisis negotiators serve a vital function within society by resolving hostage/crisis incidents. This role, performed by specially trained police ‘volunteers’ helps to prevent numerous fatalities, and forms an important part of the modern policing repertoire. There is limited research that identifies the experiences of police officers that dedicate their lives to saving others by volunteering in this capacity. The current research, therefore, provides an insight into this fundamental police role using negotiator’s personal narratives.
Design/methodology/approach
This study consisted of an exploratory qualitative grounded theoretical analysis of semi- structured interviews conducted with 15 negotiators from nine English police forces.
Findings
The analysis revealed three primary, seven secondary and 23 tertiary categories that form a conceptual model of the negotiator experience. The three primary categories consisted of ‘negotiator positives’, ‘negotiator negatives’ and ‘negotiator ambivalences’, which provide an insight into the experiences and identities of negotiators in England.
Practical implications
The findings identify several positive factors that could be used to market the role more effectively within police forces and enhance future recruitment processes. Equally, the findings highlight several operational and organisational issues that have a negative impact on the negotiator experience. The findings are, therefore, discussed in light of the practical implications for negotiator training/continuing professional development, policy and practice.
THE HOSTAGE AND CRISIS NEGOTIATOR EXPERIENCE 3
Originality/value
This paper depicts the findings from one of the first qualitative analyses of negotiator experiences and provides a unique insight into the negotiator role from an Anglo-centric perspective.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-394
Number of pages26
JournalInternational Journal of Conflict Management
Volume30
Issue number3
Early online date10 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Law enforcement
police
experience
police officer
ambivalence
development policy
Theoretical analysis
Hostage
Police
incident
narrative
methodology
market
interview

Keywords

  • Hostage and crisis negotiation
  • crisis negotiation
  • police negotiators
  • crisis negotiators
  • grounded theory
  • police officer experiences

Cite this

There’s Nothing That Compares to it”: A Grounded Theoretical Analysis of the Experiences of Police Hostage and Crisis Negotiators. / Grubb, Amy; Brown, Sarah; Hall, Peter; Bowen, Erica.

In: International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 30, No. 3, 10.06.2019, p. 369-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{eda3ab522f034bbc9632f3ea344b4417,
title = "There’s Nothing That Compares to it”: A Grounded Theoretical Analysis of the Experiences of Police Hostage and Crisis Negotiators",
abstract = "PurposeHostage and crisis negotiators serve a vital function within society by resolving hostage/crisis incidents. This role, performed by specially trained police ‘volunteers’ helps to prevent numerous fatalities, and forms an important part of the modern policing repertoire. There is limited research that identifies the experiences of police officers that dedicate their lives to saving others by volunteering in this capacity. The current research, therefore, provides an insight into this fundamental police role using negotiator’s personal narratives.Design/methodology/approachThis study consisted of an exploratory qualitative grounded theoretical analysis of semi- structured interviews conducted with 15 negotiators from nine English police forces.FindingsThe analysis revealed three primary, seven secondary and 23 tertiary categories that form a conceptual model of the negotiator experience. The three primary categories consisted of ‘negotiator positives’, ‘negotiator negatives’ and ‘negotiator ambivalences’, which provide an insight into the experiences and identities of negotiators in England.Practical implicationsThe findings identify several positive factors that could be used to market the role more effectively within police forces and enhance future recruitment processes. Equally, the findings highlight several operational and organisational issues that have a negative impact on the negotiator experience. The findings are, therefore, discussed in light of the practical implications for negotiator training/continuing professional development, policy and practice.THE HOSTAGE AND CRISIS NEGOTIATOR EXPERIENCE 3Originality/valueThis paper depicts the findings from one of the first qualitative analyses of negotiator experiences and provides a unique insight into the negotiator role from an Anglo-centric perspective.",
keywords = "Hostage and crisis negotiation, crisis negotiation, police negotiators, crisis negotiators, grounded theory, police officer experiences",
author = "Amy Grubb and Sarah Brown and Peter Hall and Erica Bowen",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1108/IJCMA-01-2019-0003",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "369--394",
journal = "International Journal of Conflict Management",
issn = "1044-4068",
publisher = "Emerald",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - There’s Nothing That Compares to it”: A Grounded Theoretical Analysis of the Experiences of Police Hostage and Crisis Negotiators

AU - Grubb, Amy

AU - Brown, Sarah

AU - Hall, Peter

AU - Bowen, Erica

PY - 2019/6/10

Y1 - 2019/6/10

N2 - PurposeHostage and crisis negotiators serve a vital function within society by resolving hostage/crisis incidents. This role, performed by specially trained police ‘volunteers’ helps to prevent numerous fatalities, and forms an important part of the modern policing repertoire. There is limited research that identifies the experiences of police officers that dedicate their lives to saving others by volunteering in this capacity. The current research, therefore, provides an insight into this fundamental police role using negotiator’s personal narratives.Design/methodology/approachThis study consisted of an exploratory qualitative grounded theoretical analysis of semi- structured interviews conducted with 15 negotiators from nine English police forces.FindingsThe analysis revealed three primary, seven secondary and 23 tertiary categories that form a conceptual model of the negotiator experience. The three primary categories consisted of ‘negotiator positives’, ‘negotiator negatives’ and ‘negotiator ambivalences’, which provide an insight into the experiences and identities of negotiators in England.Practical implicationsThe findings identify several positive factors that could be used to market the role more effectively within police forces and enhance future recruitment processes. Equally, the findings highlight several operational and organisational issues that have a negative impact on the negotiator experience. The findings are, therefore, discussed in light of the practical implications for negotiator training/continuing professional development, policy and practice.THE HOSTAGE AND CRISIS NEGOTIATOR EXPERIENCE 3Originality/valueThis paper depicts the findings from one of the first qualitative analyses of negotiator experiences and provides a unique insight into the negotiator role from an Anglo-centric perspective.

AB - PurposeHostage and crisis negotiators serve a vital function within society by resolving hostage/crisis incidents. This role, performed by specially trained police ‘volunteers’ helps to prevent numerous fatalities, and forms an important part of the modern policing repertoire. There is limited research that identifies the experiences of police officers that dedicate their lives to saving others by volunteering in this capacity. The current research, therefore, provides an insight into this fundamental police role using negotiator’s personal narratives.Design/methodology/approachThis study consisted of an exploratory qualitative grounded theoretical analysis of semi- structured interviews conducted with 15 negotiators from nine English police forces.FindingsThe analysis revealed three primary, seven secondary and 23 tertiary categories that form a conceptual model of the negotiator experience. The three primary categories consisted of ‘negotiator positives’, ‘negotiator negatives’ and ‘negotiator ambivalences’, which provide an insight into the experiences and identities of negotiators in England.Practical implicationsThe findings identify several positive factors that could be used to market the role more effectively within police forces and enhance future recruitment processes. Equally, the findings highlight several operational and organisational issues that have a negative impact on the negotiator experience. The findings are, therefore, discussed in light of the practical implications for negotiator training/continuing professional development, policy and practice.THE HOSTAGE AND CRISIS NEGOTIATOR EXPERIENCE 3Originality/valueThis paper depicts the findings from one of the first qualitative analyses of negotiator experiences and provides a unique insight into the negotiator role from an Anglo-centric perspective.

KW - Hostage and crisis negotiation

KW - crisis negotiation

KW - police negotiators

KW - crisis negotiators

KW - grounded theory

KW - police officer experiences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071526785&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/IJCMA-01-2019-0003

DO - 10.1108/IJCMA-01-2019-0003

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 369

EP - 394

JO - International Journal of Conflict Management

JF - International Journal of Conflict Management

SN - 1044-4068

IS - 3

ER -