‘The Way we do Things Around Here’: Personal and Epistemological Reflections of the Influence of Inter-Disciplinary Identity on Effective Knowledge Leadership for Tackling Inequalities

Alyson Nicholds

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Purpose This chapter seeks to examine the ways in which universitybased
researchers can facilitate the understanding and awareness of public
policy-makers and key decision-makers in the contribution to theory
and complexity research can make to contemporary public policy.
Design The chapter provides a systematic literature review informed
by reference to key urban regeneration strategies in the United Kingdom.
Findings The chapter argues that it is through the promotion of interdisciplinary
approaches to understanding and learning that we might
develop the reflective capacities of decision-makers.
Implications/Originality The chapter is intentionally speculative and
seeks to encourage critical self-reflection.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLooking for Consensus?:
Subtitle of host publicationCivil Society, Social Movements and Crises for Public Management
EditorsJohn Diamond, Joyce Liddle
Pages141-160
Number of pages20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Publication series

NameCritical Perspectives on International Public Sector Management
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited

Keywords

  • Inter-disciplinary
  • leadership
  • multi-disciplinary
  • reflection
  • reflexivity

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    Nicholds, A. (2013). ‘The Way we do Things Around Here’: Personal and Epistemological Reflections of the Influence of Inter-Disciplinary Identity on Effective Knowledge Leadership for Tackling Inequalities. In J. Diamond, & J. Liddle (Eds.), Looking for Consensus?: : Civil Society, Social Movements and Crises for Public Management (pp. 141-160). (Critical Perspectives on International Public Sector Management). https://doi.org/10.1108/S2045-7944%282013%290000002011