The Voice of the Child: A Legal Voice?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article presents a legal analysis of the 'voice of the child' in family proceedings, both public and private. The evaluation is thus confined to civil law and is not concerned with young offenders within the criminal justice system. There have been significant legislative developments in the last decade arising from UK, European, and UN provisions. The article assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the rights to representation of children in these legal proceedings and in particular outlines the weaknesses in the proceedings of 'private' law about children. Making recommendations for future reform, the article argues that consistent implementation of the provisions requires greater attention to be paid to direct representation and advocacy for the child's views, in contrast to adult presentation of their own views about the best interests of the child.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-209
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Social Work Practice
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Child Advocacy
Criminal Law
United Nations
legal proceedings
private law
civil law
offender
UNO
justice
reform
evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Drug guides

Cite this

The Voice of the Child : A Legal Voice? / Hardy, Stephen.

In: Journal of Social Work Practice, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.12.1999, p. 204-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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