The Tension in the Eastern Mediterranean: Is Dialogue Between Greece and Turkey Possible Despite Their Differences?

Cihan Dizdaroglu

    Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

    Abstract

    The continuing escalation in the Eastern Mediterranean runs the risk of becoming a conflict between Greece and Turkey. In the absence of US mediation, trying to create a dialogue would be the most reasonable option for diplomacy and de-escalation.

    History has demonstrated that both countries have enough experience to coexist without making tangible changes in their disputes. So there is no need to churn out a slew of new ideas to resolve each contentious issue, as both Greece and Turkey still observe the Berne Declaration of 1976. By doing so, the two parties will continue to “reserve their respective positions” in the Eastern Mediterranean, but also “refrain from any initiative or act” until they find a settlement through negations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Specialist publicationAustralian Outlook
    PublisherAustralian Institute of International Affairs
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2020

    Bibliographical note

    This article is published under a Creative Commons License and can be republished with attribution.

    Keywords

    • Greece
    • Turkey
    • Eastern Mediterranean
    • Cyprus
    • Dialogue

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