The role of assistive technology in renegotiating the inclusion of students with disabilities in Higher Education in North Africa

Deanne Clouder, Jacqueline Cawston, Katherine Wimpenny, Ahmed Khalifa Aly Mehanna, Youcef Hdouch, Iman Raissouni, Karima Selmaoui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
57 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article considers the impact of a two-year collaborative European Union funded project. The ‘Sustainable Ways to Increase Higher Education Students’ Equal Access to Learning Environments’ (SWING) project, brought together four European higher education institutions, one institution in Egypt and two in Morocco. It aimed to promote equal access to university education, and future career opportunities, for students with disabilities in the North African countries, using accessible assistive technology. Appreciative inquiry was used to explore the impact of the project processes and outcomes. We will share how the focus on assistive technology addressed the invisibility of students with disabilities by promoting individual and collective student agency. Students’ emerging sense of empowerment is attributed to two factors that inform the wider inclusive education debate: the power of technology as a mediator of change and the importance of a bottom up/ top down dynamic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1344-1357
Number of pages14
JournalStudies in Higher Education
Volume44
Issue number8
Early online date23 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Studies in Higher Education on 23rd February 2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03075079.2018.1437721

Keywords

  • Students with disabilities
  • agency
  • assistive technologies
  • inclusive education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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