The role of alcohol as men desist from physical intimate partner violence

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Introduction and AimsAlthough researchers have examined the relationship between alcohol and perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV), little research has examined the role of alcohol within the process of desistance from IPV, which was the aim of this study.Design and MethodsA mixed-methods approach was taken as both psychometric test and interview data were analysed. Scores on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III alcohol dependence subscale of 37 men deemed to have desisted from IPV, 50 deemed to be persisting with IPV and 49 non-violent controls were compared. In addition, data about alcohol use from interviews with 13 desisters, 9 persisters, 9 IPV intervention facilitators and 7 female survivors were analysed using thematic analysis to understand the role of alcohol in IPV desistance and persistence.ResultsNo differences were found between the groups' self-reported alcohol dependence based on their Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III scores. However, analysis of the interview data revealed that compared with persisters, desisters reported having changed their attitudes towards alcohol and their consumption of it in order to facilitate their cessation of violence.Discussion and ConclusionsStatic measures of alcohol dependence need to be used with caution if looking to identify progress with desistance from IPV. For individuals for whom alcohol played a role in their IPV, changing attitudes and their use of alcohol were described as being important in the process of desistance. Self-reported attitudes and alcohol use could therefore be used to identify men who are making progress in the process of desistance from IPV. [Walker K. The role of alcohol as men desist from physical intimate partner violence. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;00-000]

    Publisher Statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Walker, K 2017, 'The role of alcohol as men desist from physical intimate partner violence' Drug and Alcohol Review, vol 36, no. 1, pp. 134-142, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12445 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)134-142
    Number of pages9
    JournalDrug and Alcohol Review
    Volume36
    Issue number1
    Early online date27 Jun 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

    Fingerprint

    alcohol
    Alcohols
    violence
    Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory
    Alcoholism
    Interviews
    Physical Abuse
    Intimate Partner Violence
    interview
    drug
    Psychometrics
    Violence
    Alcohol Drinking
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    Survivors
    Research Personnel
    psychometrics
    persistence
    Research

    Bibliographical note

    This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Walker, K 2017, 'The role of alcohol as men desist from physical intimate partner violence' Drug and Alcohol Review, vol 36, no. 1, pp. 134-142, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12445 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

    Keywords

    • intimate partner violence
    • alcohol dependence
    • desistance narrative

    Cite this

    The role of alcohol as men desist from physical intimate partner violence. / Walker, Kate.

    In: Drug and Alcohol Review, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.2017, p. 134-142.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "Introduction and AimsAlthough researchers have examined the relationship between alcohol and perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV), little research has examined the role of alcohol within the process of desistance from IPV, which was the aim of this study.Design and MethodsA mixed-methods approach was taken as both psychometric test and interview data were analysed. Scores on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III alcohol dependence subscale of 37 men deemed to have desisted from IPV, 50 deemed to be persisting with IPV and 49 non-violent controls were compared. In addition, data about alcohol use from interviews with 13 desisters, 9 persisters, 9 IPV intervention facilitators and 7 female survivors were analysed using thematic analysis to understand the role of alcohol in IPV desistance and persistence.ResultsNo differences were found between the groups' self-reported alcohol dependence based on their Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III scores. However, analysis of the interview data revealed that compared with persisters, desisters reported having changed their attitudes towards alcohol and their consumption of it in order to facilitate their cessation of violence.Discussion and ConclusionsStatic measures of alcohol dependence need to be used with caution if looking to identify progress with desistance from IPV. For individuals for whom alcohol played a role in their IPV, changing attitudes and their use of alcohol were described as being important in the process of desistance. Self-reported attitudes and alcohol use could therefore be used to identify men who are making progress in the process of desistance from IPV. [Walker K. The role of alcohol as men desist from physical intimate partner violence. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;00-000]Publisher Statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Walker, K 2017, 'The role of alcohol as men desist from physical intimate partner violence' Drug and Alcohol Review, vol 36, no. 1, pp. 134-142, which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12445 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.",
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