The Relationship Between Latent Inhibition and Performance at a Non-intentional Precognition Task

Glenn Hitchman, Simon Sherwood, Chris Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
27 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Many spontaneous cases of extra-sensory perception (ESP) seem to occur without the conscious intent of the experient to manifest any anomalous phenomena. Indeed, Stanford׳s psi-mediated instrumental response (PMIR) theory, which frames ESP as a goal-oriented function, goes as far as to suggest that such intent may be counterproductive to psi. A total of 50 participants completed a two-part auditory discrimination performance measure of latent inhibition; a battery of questionnaires; and a 15-trial, binary, forced-choice, non-intentional precognition task. They were then either positively or negatively rewarded via images from subsets that they had pre-rated, seeing more images from their preferred subsets the better they performed at the psi task and vice versa.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118–126
JournalThe Relationship Between Latent Inhibition and Performance at a Non-intentional Precognition Task
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Dec 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Extra-sensory perception
  • non-intentional precognition
  • latent inhibition

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