The Relationship Between Latent Inhibition and Performance at a Non-intentional Precognition Task

Glenn Hitchman, Simon Sherwood, Chris Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Many spontaneous cases of extra-sensory perception (ESP) seem to occur without the conscious intent of the experient to manifest any anomalous phenomena. Indeed, Stanford׳s psi-mediated instrumental response (PMIR) theory, which frames ESP as a goal-oriented function, goes as far as to suggest that such intent may be counterproductive to psi. A total of 50 participants completed a two-part auditory discrimination performance measure of latent inhibition; a battery of questionnaires; and a 15-trial, binary, forced-choice, non-intentional precognition task. They were then either positively or negatively rewarded via images from subsets that they had pre-rated, seeing more images from their preferred subsets the better they performed at the psi task and vice versa.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118–126
JournalThe Relationship Between Latent Inhibition and Performance at a Non-intentional Precognition Task
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Dec 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Subset
Battery
Performance Measures
Questionnaire
Anomalous
Discrimination
Binary
Relationships
Perception
Inhibition (Psychology)
Discrimination (Psychology)
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Extra-sensory perception
  • non-intentional precognition
  • latent inhibition

Cite this

The Relationship Between Latent Inhibition and Performance at a Non-intentional Precognition Task. / Hitchman, Glenn; Sherwood, Simon; Roe, Chris.

In: The Relationship Between Latent Inhibition and Performance at a Non-intentional Precognition Task, Vol. 11, No. 2, 24.12.2014, p. 118–126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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