THE POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPING URBAN MINES FROM HOUSEHOLD STOCKPILED SMALL WEEE

Xavier Pierron, I. D. Williams, P. Shaw, F. Ongondo

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The Ellen Mac Arthur Foundation (2014) estimated that Cat. 3 Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) / Internet and Communication Technology (ICT) devices such as mobile phones and tablets have reached a 15% collection rate in the European Union (EU). Ongondo and Williams (2011) have calculated that 36.7 million mobile phones were stockpiled by higher education students in the UK, USA, Germany and Australia, representing 1,200 tonnes of strategic and critical materials. More than a billion handsets are shipped each year (Gartner, 2015) and research shows that a large majority is not collected when these devices become WEEE. This uncollected WEEE is rich of strategic and critical materials that could be used to sustain urban mines within a circular economy; yielding supply security and growth in the EU (European Commission, 2014). Also with the recent European Commission withdrawal from the Circular Economy package and the thin margins the waste management industry operates on, significant economic incentives to develop urban-mines are unlikely. A new approach looking at alternate incentive methods need to be implemented in addition to the factors already identified by current behavioural models applied to household recycling.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventInternational Waste Management and Landfill Symposium - Forte Village, Margherita di Pula , Italy
Duration: 5 Oct 20159 Oct 2015

Conference

ConferenceInternational Waste Management and Landfill Symposium
CountryItaly
CityMargherita di Pula
Period5/10/159/10/15

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electronic equipment
European Commission
European Union
higher education
waste management
incentive
recycling
student
communication
industry
household
material
mobile phone
economy

Bibliographical note

The full text is currently unavailable on the repository.

Cite this

Pierron, X., Williams, I. D., Shaw, P., & Ongondo, F. (2015). THE POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPING URBAN MINES FROM HOUSEHOLD STOCKPILED SMALL WEEE. Paper presented at International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Margherita di Pula , Italy.

THE POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPING URBAN MINES FROM HOUSEHOLD STOCKPILED SMALL WEEE. / Pierron, Xavier; Williams, I. D.; Shaw, P.; Ongondo, F.

2015. Paper presented at International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Margherita di Pula , Italy.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Pierron, X, Williams, ID, Shaw, P & Ongondo, F 2015, 'THE POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPING URBAN MINES FROM HOUSEHOLD STOCKPILED SMALL WEEE' Paper presented at International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Margherita di Pula , Italy, 5/10/15 - 9/10/15, .
Pierron X, Williams ID, Shaw P, Ongondo F. THE POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPING URBAN MINES FROM HOUSEHOLD STOCKPILED SMALL WEEE. 2015. Paper presented at International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Margherita di Pula , Italy.
Pierron, Xavier ; Williams, I. D. ; Shaw, P. ; Ongondo, F. / THE POTENTIAL FOR DEVELOPING URBAN MINES FROM HOUSEHOLD STOCKPILED SMALL WEEE. Paper presented at International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Margherita di Pula , Italy.
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AB - The Ellen Mac Arthur Foundation (2014) estimated that Cat. 3 Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) / Internet and Communication Technology (ICT) devices such as mobile phones and tablets have reached a 15% collection rate in the European Union (EU). Ongondo and Williams (2011) have calculated that 36.7 million mobile phones were stockpiled by higher education students in the UK, USA, Germany and Australia, representing 1,200 tonnes of strategic and critical materials. More than a billion handsets are shipped each year (Gartner, 2015) and research shows that a large majority is not collected when these devices become WEEE. This uncollected WEEE is rich of strategic and critical materials that could be used to sustain urban mines within a circular economy; yielding supply security and growth in the EU (European Commission, 2014). Also with the recent European Commission withdrawal from the Circular Economy package and the thin margins the waste management industry operates on, significant economic incentives to develop urban-mines are unlikely. A new approach looking at alternate incentive methods need to be implemented in addition to the factors already identified by current behavioural models applied to household recycling.

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