The positions of primary and secondary schools in the English school field: a case of durable inequality

John Coldron, Megan Crawford, Steve Jones, Tim Simkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In interviews as part of a research study of structural reform in England, some tension between primary head teachers and their secondary peers was evident. This was symptomatic of a long-standing difference in status between the two phases. At a time when relations between stakeholders in local systems are subject to change, we seek to understand anew why that might be the case and how the tension we found was evidence of a current difference of power within interactions between representatives of the phases. We analyse differences of size, resources, workforce, pedagogy and history, and how they have resulted in different, and differently valued, practices and professional identities. We explore how attributes of the two phases have been counterposed and how, in complex interaction with wider discourses of politics, gender and age, this process has invested the differences with meanings and values that tend to relegate attributes associated with primary school. By focusing on the activation of cumulative inequality in interactions, we contribute a complementary perspective to studies of perceived relative status and highlight the implications for understanding school positioning in local arenas as the role of local authorities is reduced.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)671-687
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Education Policy
Volume30
Issue number5
Early online date31 Oct 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

primary school
secondary school
interaction
school
structural reform
activation
stakeholder
politics
discourse
gender
teacher
history
interview
resources
evidence
Values
time

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Education Policy on 31/10/2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02680939.2014.972989

Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

Keywords

  • Capital
  • England
  • Primary schools
  • Relations between schools
  • Secondary schools

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The positions of primary and secondary schools in the English school field : a case of durable inequality. / Coldron, John; Crawford, Megan; Jones, Steve; Simkins, Tim.

In: Journal of Education Policy, Vol. 30, No. 5, 01.01.2015, p. 671-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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