The Politics of Being Muslim and Female: Religion, Feminism and Hierarchies of Knowledge

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

By prioritising male ways of being and knowing, existing social hierarchies marginalise women (Le Doeuff 1998). For centuries women have been engaging in activism to challenge their marginalisation and to demand equal recognition of women’s contributions to civilisation. Such activism by and for women is ‘politics’, yet for ‘for most of its history, western political theory has ignored women’ (Bryson 2003: 1). Focussing on the experiences of Muslim women and informed by a feminist epistemological stance, this chapter will unravel women’s negotiations around religious and gendered identity markers, exploring how one influences the other to ‘politicise’ Muslim women. In doing so this chapter will take its readers on a journey through the evolution of feminist political thought, particularly where it intersects with women’s religious practices and beliefs.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationRoutledge Handbook of Religion and Politics
PublisherRoutledge
Pages(In-press)
Volume(In-press)
Edition3
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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feminism
Muslim
Religion
politics
political theory
civilization
demand
history

Cite this

Cheruvallil-Contractor, S. (2020). The Politics of Being Muslim and Female: Religion, Feminism and Hierarchies of Knowledge. In Routledge Handbook of Religion and Politics (3 ed., Vol. (In-press), pp. (In-press)). Routledge.

The Politics of Being Muslim and Female : Religion, Feminism and Hierarchies of Knowledge. / Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya.

Routledge Handbook of Religion and Politics. Vol. (In-press) 3. ed. Routledge, 2020. p. (In-press).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cheruvallil-Contractor, S 2020, The Politics of Being Muslim and Female: Religion, Feminism and Hierarchies of Knowledge. in Routledge Handbook of Religion and Politics. 3 edn, vol. (In-press), Routledge, pp. (In-press).
Cheruvallil-Contractor S. The Politics of Being Muslim and Female: Religion, Feminism and Hierarchies of Knowledge. In Routledge Handbook of Religion and Politics. 3 ed. Vol. (In-press). Routledge. 2020. p. (In-press)
Cheruvallil-Contractor, Sariya. / The Politics of Being Muslim and Female : Religion, Feminism and Hierarchies of Knowledge. Routledge Handbook of Religion and Politics. Vol. (In-press) 3. ed. Routledge, 2020. pp. (In-press)
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