The Persistence of Self-injurious and Aggressive Behavior in Males with Fragile X Syndrome Over 8 Years: A Longitudinal Study of Prevalence and Predictive Risk Markers

Hayley Crawford, Efthalia Karakatsani, Gursharan Singla, Chris Oliver

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Abstract

Self-injurious and aggressive behaviors are common in fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, little is known about the persistence of these behaviors and associated risk markers. We established the prevalence and persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behaviors over eight years in males with FXS, and associations with risk markers. Results showed 77% and 69% persistence rates for self-injurious and aggressive behavior, respectively. Baseline levels of repetitive behavior predicted persistent self-injurious behavior. Chronological age, impulsivity and overactivity were associated with persistent aggressive behavior but only impulsivity predicted persistence. This is the first study to document the persistence of self-injurious and aggressive behavior in FXS over the medium to long term and to identify behavioral risk markers that might facilitate targeted early intervention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2913-2922
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume49
Issue number7
Early online date24 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jul 2019

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Bibliographical note

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Autism
  • Challenging behavior
  • Early intervention
  • Fragile X syndrome
  • Impulsivity
  • Repetitive behavior
  • Risk markers
  • Self-injurious behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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