The mediating effect of environmental and ethical behaviour on supply chain partnership decisions and management appreciation of supplier partnership risks

David Gallear, Abby Ghobadian, Qile He

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Green supply chain management and environmental and ethical behaviour (EEB), a major component of corporate responsibility (CR), are rapidly developing fields in research and practice. The influence and effect of EEB at the functional level, however, is under-researched. Similarly, the management of risk in the supply chain has become a practical concern for many firms. It is important that managers have a good understanding of the risks associated with supplier partnerships. This paper examines the effect of firms’ investment in EEB as part of corporate social responsibility in mediating the relationship between supply chain partnership (SCP) and management appreciation of the risk of partnering. We hypothesise that simply entering into a SCP does not facilitate an appreciation of the risk of partnering and may even hamper such awareness. However, such an appreciation of the risk is facilitated through CR’s environmental and stakeholder management ethos. The study contributes further by separating risk into distinct relational and performance components. The results of a firm-level survey confirm the mediation effect, highlighting the value to supply chain strategy and design of investing in EEB on three fronts: building internal awareness, monitoring and sharing best practice.
Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 18th July 2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00207543.2014.937010
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6455-6472
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Production Research
Volume53
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jul 2014

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Supply chains
Supply chain management
Supply chain
Environmental behavior
Suppliers
Ethical behavior
Mediating effect
Managers
Monitoring
Partnering

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 18th July 2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00207543.2014.937010

Keywords

  • environmental and ethical behaviour
  • corporate responsibility
  • supplier partnerships
  • relational risk
  • performance risk
  • mediation

Cite this

The mediating effect of environmental and ethical behaviour on supply chain partnership decisions and management appreciation of supplier partnership risks. / Gallear, David; Ghobadian, Abby; He, Qile.

In: International Journal of Production Research, Vol. 53, No. 21, 18.07.2014, p. 6455-6472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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