The Master Gardener Programme working with urban communities: Garden Organic’s London Food Poverty Project Southwark, Report for Garden Organic: Southwark Food Poverty Project

Geraldine Brown, Nathan Kerrigan , Jana Fried

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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Abstract

GARDEN ORGANIC’S MASTER GARDENER
PROGRAMME
Independent evaluations of the Master Gardener
Programme identified a number of positive
outcomes for volunteers, communities, households
and substance misusing prisoners (undertaken by
CAFS and Coventry University (Kneafsey and Bos,
2014; Brown et al 2015). Hence, to date key findings
have identified a number of positive outcomes when
communities engage in food growing and related
activities including:
• Health and Well Being
• Skills base and employability
• Community life
• Food eating and buying
• Food recycling and composting
• Building relationships
• Supporting recovery
This research has highlighted a relationship
between a range of positive social outcomes and
the aim of this project is to ascertain the potential
benefits of adapting the Master Gardener model
and delivering the programme in an urban locality
identified as an area of deprivation in which some
people living in the local community are ‘at risk’ or
experiencing food poverty.

Funded by The Hirschmann Foundation, a non-profit
charitable foundation [http://hirschmannstiftung.ch/
en/index.cfm], The London Food Poverty Project
[https://www.gardenorganic.org. uk/food-poverty]
aimed to work with communities to build resilience
and knowledge so that involved communities feel
confident to address the triggers of food poverty
positively and proactively.

The approach used was to encourage participation
in food growing and cooking when on a low income.
The project targeted individuals and families living in
communities across Southwark.

This report presents key findings from an evaluation
of Garden Organic’s London Food Poverty Project
(LFPP). Carried out by a team of researchers from
Coventry University.
The report is organised in four
sections:
1. Background Context
Food poverty and community-based
programmes
2. Collaborative Community Research
Approach, methods and participants
3. Key Findings
Community growing, cooking and
networks
4. Reflections and key learning points
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationCoventry University
PublisherCoventry University
Number of pages55
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Food Poverty, health and Well-being, food growing, communities

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