The investigation of suitability of aeronautical decision-making mnemonics in tactical environments

Wen Chin Li, Don Harris, Chung San Yu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to evaluate the suitability of ADM mnemonics for training decision making in cadet pilots. Sixty instructor pilots and forty-seven cadet pilots in the Republic of China Air Force Academy participated. They assessed the suitability of five different ADM mnemonics (SHOR -Wohl, 1981; PASS -Maher, 1989; FOR-DEC -Hormann, 1995; SOAR -Oldaker, 1995; and DESIDE - Murray, 1997) in the 6 different basic types of decision-making situation described by Orasanu (1993). These included go/no go decisions; recognition-primed decisions; response selection decisions; resource management decisions; non-diagnostic procedural decisions, and problem-solving. The findings indicated that SHOR was regarded as the most suitable mnemonic for application in time-limited and critical, urgent situations and DESIDE was thought to be superior for knowledge-based decisions which needed more comprehensive consideration but were less time limited.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005
Pages2187-2191
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: 26 Sep 200530 Sep 2005

Conference

Conference49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period26/09/0530/09/05

Keywords

  • Aeronautical decision-making (ADM)
  • Human error
  • Knowledge-based decisions
  • Rule-based decisions
  • Training mnemonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Li, W. C., Harris, D., & Yu, C. S. (2005). The investigation of suitability of aeronautical decision-making mnemonics in tactical environments. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005 (pp. 2187-2191)