The influence of a postgraduate clinical master’s qualification in manual therapy on the careers of physiotherapists in the United Kingdom

Ann S. Green, Jo Perry, Karen Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last decade there has been potential for manual therapists to extend their roles and develop their careers. In order to explore the career pathways of a group of postgraduate manual therapists and to identify the influence of Master’s education on those careers, a postal questionnaire was sent to all graduates from a clinically based programme (response rate 62.3%, n ¼ 48, with representation from each year over a 10-year period). All the respondents were still working in physiotherapy and the majority had a clinical element to their role (83%). The new career framework, which seeks to enable therapists to progress their careers and retain a clinical work load is demonstrated within this sample, with 6.2% achieving Consultant Therapist roles, 14.4% in Extended Scope Practitioner posts and 16.6% working as Clinical Specialists. Positive contributions from Master’s education were the status of the qualification, improved clinical skills and increased confidence. Negative factors were less clinical ‘hands-on’ within their roles, lack of time and an increase in management responsibilities. Findings suggest that Master’s education has enabled the participants to take on the new roles that
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139–147
JournalManual Therapy
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Feb 2007

Fingerprint

Musculoskeletal Manipulations
Physical Therapists
Education
Clinical Competence
Consultants
Workload
United Kingdom
Surveys and Questionnaires

Bibliographical note

The full-text of this article is not available from this repository.

Keywords

  • Manual therapy
  • Physiotherapy careers
  • Postgraduate education

Cite this

The influence of a postgraduate clinical master’s qualification in manual therapy on the careers of physiotherapists in the United Kingdom. / Green, Ann S.; Perry, Jo; Harrison, Karen.

In: Manual Therapy, Vol. 13, No. 2, 16.02.2007, p. 139–147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{778d92d046214afab053991d982f8852,
title = "The influence of a postgraduate clinical master’s qualification in manual therapy on the careers of physiotherapists in the United Kingdom",
abstract = "Over the last decade there has been potential for manual therapists to extend their roles and develop their careers. In order to explore the career pathways of a group of postgraduate manual therapists and to identify the influence of Master’s education on those careers, a postal questionnaire was sent to all graduates from a clinically based programme (response rate 62.3{\%}, n ¼ 48, with representation from each year over a 10-year period). All the respondents were still working in physiotherapy and the majority had a clinical element to their role (83{\%}). The new career framework, which seeks to enable therapists to progress their careers and retain a clinical work load is demonstrated within this sample, with 6.2{\%} achieving Consultant Therapist roles, 14.4{\%} in Extended Scope Practitioner posts and 16.6{\%} working as Clinical Specialists. Positive contributions from Master’s education were the status of the qualification, improved clinical skills and increased confidence. Negative factors were less clinical ‘hands-on’ within their roles, lack of time and an increase in management responsibilities. Findings suggest that Master’s education has enabled the participants to take on the new roles that",
keywords = "Manual therapy, Physiotherapy careers, Postgraduate education",
author = "Green, {Ann S.} and Jo Perry and Karen Harrison",
note = "The full-text of this article is not available from this repository.",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1016/j.math.2006.12.001",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "139–147",
journal = "Manual Therapy",
issn = "1356-689X",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of a postgraduate clinical master’s qualification in manual therapy on the careers of physiotherapists in the United Kingdom

AU - Green, Ann S.

AU - Perry, Jo

AU - Harrison, Karen

N1 - The full-text of this article is not available from this repository.

PY - 2007/2/16

Y1 - 2007/2/16

N2 - Over the last decade there has been potential for manual therapists to extend their roles and develop their careers. In order to explore the career pathways of a group of postgraduate manual therapists and to identify the influence of Master’s education on those careers, a postal questionnaire was sent to all graduates from a clinically based programme (response rate 62.3%, n ¼ 48, with representation from each year over a 10-year period). All the respondents were still working in physiotherapy and the majority had a clinical element to their role (83%). The new career framework, which seeks to enable therapists to progress their careers and retain a clinical work load is demonstrated within this sample, with 6.2% achieving Consultant Therapist roles, 14.4% in Extended Scope Practitioner posts and 16.6% working as Clinical Specialists. Positive contributions from Master’s education were the status of the qualification, improved clinical skills and increased confidence. Negative factors were less clinical ‘hands-on’ within their roles, lack of time and an increase in management responsibilities. Findings suggest that Master’s education has enabled the participants to take on the new roles that

AB - Over the last decade there has been potential for manual therapists to extend their roles and develop their careers. In order to explore the career pathways of a group of postgraduate manual therapists and to identify the influence of Master’s education on those careers, a postal questionnaire was sent to all graduates from a clinically based programme (response rate 62.3%, n ¼ 48, with representation from each year over a 10-year period). All the respondents were still working in physiotherapy and the majority had a clinical element to their role (83%). The new career framework, which seeks to enable therapists to progress their careers and retain a clinical work load is demonstrated within this sample, with 6.2% achieving Consultant Therapist roles, 14.4% in Extended Scope Practitioner posts and 16.6% working as Clinical Specialists. Positive contributions from Master’s education were the status of the qualification, improved clinical skills and increased confidence. Negative factors were less clinical ‘hands-on’ within their roles, lack of time and an increase in management responsibilities. Findings suggest that Master’s education has enabled the participants to take on the new roles that

KW - Manual therapy

KW - Physiotherapy careers

KW - Postgraduate education

U2 - 10.1016/j.math.2006.12.001

DO - 10.1016/j.math.2006.12.001

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 139

EP - 147

JO - Manual Therapy

JF - Manual Therapy

SN - 1356-689X

IS - 2

ER -