The importance of sleep: attentional problems in school-aged children with Down syndrome and Williams syndrome

Anna Ashworth

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)
    63 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    In typically developing (TD) children, sleep problems have been associated with day-time attentional difficulties. Children with developmental disabilities often suffer with sleep and attention problems, yet their relationship is poorly understood. The present study investigated this association in school-aged children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS). Actigraphy and pulse oximetry assessed sleep and sleep-disordered breathing respectively, and attention was tested using a novel visual Continuous Performance Task (CPT).Attentional deficits were evident in both disorder groups. In the TD group, higher scores on the CPT were related to better sleep quality, higher oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), and fewer desaturation events. Sleep quality, duration, and SpO2 variables were not related to CPT performance for children with DS and WS. Publisher statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Behavioral Sleep Medicine on 15th Aug 2014, available online: www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15402002.2014.940107 .
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)455-471
    JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
    Volume13
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Bibliographical note

    Please note Dr Ashworth was working at the Institute of Education, London at the time this paper was written.
    This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Behavioral Sleep Medicine on 15th Aug 2014, available online: www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15402002.2014.940107 .

    Keywords

    • attentional deficits
    • sleep
    • developmental disabilities
    • children

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