The impact of a school-based gardening intervention on intentions and behaviour related to fruit and vegetable consumption in children

Michael J. Duncan, Emma Eyre, E. Bryant, Neil Clarke, Samantha Birch, V. Staples, D. Sheffield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)
14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Seventy-seven children (34 boys, 43 girls, Mean age ± SD = 9 ± 1 years) participated in this study. Forty-six children (intervention) undertook a 12 week school gardening programme and 31 children acted as controls. Measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and fruit and vegetable consumption were taken pre and post intervention. Repeated measures analysis of variance and hierarchical regression analysis indicated that the intervention group increased daily consumption of fruit and vegetables and increased intentions, attitudes, norms, PBC related to fruit and vegetable consumption. Attitudes, norms and PBC significantly predicted changes in fruit and vegetable consumption.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)765-773
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Theory of Planned Behaviour
  • intervention
  • diet
  • gardening
  • primary schools

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of a school-based gardening intervention on intentions and behaviour related to fruit and vegetable consumption in children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this