The Hidden Effect of Return Diaspora to Post-conflict Countries: The Case of Policy and Temporary Return to Rwanda.

Reiko Shindo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In response to the paucity of human resources in post-conflict societies, various agencies have implemented programmes to facilitate returns of qualified diasporas to their countries of origin. This paper examines the context in which diaspora return programmes have emerged and developed, and implications of the return programmes for post-conflict societies. It specifically looks at Migration for Development in Africa (mida) using the example of Rwanda. The paper demonstrates that the prime purpose of diaspora return programmes is to mitigate the effect of brain drain caused by migration from the South to the North. Furthermore, the paper argues that a secondary purpose of the programmes can be to secure a chance of return for diasporas who would like to return to their countries of origin but would like to stay away from the politics of these countries. In conclusion, the author suggests that diaspora return may increase the multiplicity of voices available in countries that tightly control dissident voices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1685-1702
Number of pages18
JournalThird World Quarterly
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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