The Fabularium: A reflective case study of Practice-as-Research (P-a-R) into outdoor performance training and graduate enterprise delivered at Coventry University 2010-2017.

Glenn Noble

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Abstract

This article documents the formation and development an outdoor performance company that has emerged from pedagogical research and practice undertaken since 2010.

The semi-formal training of (initially undergraduate) performers has focused upon popular outdoor performance skillsets, including half and full mask work; puppetry; acrobatics; stilt walking; fooling; walkabouts; drum processions; story-telling vignettes and songs. The work has explicitly drawn upon historical traditions, reinterpreting the mummers’ bestiary and Commedia dell’Arte, as well as other 20th century approaches to mask performance.

Training models have emerged which bear comparison to historical models for training in popular performance. There is a sense of a journeyman’s approach to training and skills acquisition, as older performers pass on personal repertoires of physical routines, sight gags and tricks, audience interaction and patter etc. Students also work as ‘apprentices’ alongside professional puppet and mask makers and peer-to-peer training is discussed whereby previously trained Fabularium performers pass on the repertoire to new performers. The apparent continuity of approach is examined as traditional popular forms are assimilated and passed on via these teaching and training methods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-205
Number of pages18
JournalTheatre, Dance and Performance Training
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2017

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graduate
performance
journeyman
training method
apprentice
teaching method
song
continuity
Practice as Research
Enterprise
Reflective
Coventry
interaction
Performer
student
Mask
Peers
Repertoire

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in
Theatre, Dance and Performance Training on 20th July 2017, available
online: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19443927.2017.1316307
Copyright © and Moral Rights are retained by the author(s) and/ or other copyright
owners. A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study,
without prior permission or charge. This item cannot be reproduced or quoted extensively
from without first obtaining permission in writing from the copyright holder(s). The
content must not be changed in any way or sold commercially in any format or medium
without the formal permission of the copyright holders.

Keywords

  • Acrobatics
  • Masks
  • Jongleurs
  • Repertoire
  • Graduate Enterprise
  • Medieval Bestiary

Cite this

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abstract = "This article documents the formation and development an outdoor performance company that has emerged from pedagogical research and practice undertaken since 2010.The semi-formal training of (initially undergraduate) performers has focused upon popular outdoor performance skillsets, including half and full mask work; puppetry; acrobatics; stilt walking; fooling; walkabouts; drum processions; story-telling vignettes and songs. The work has explicitly drawn upon historical traditions, reinterpreting the mummers’ bestiary and Commedia dell’Arte, as well as other 20th century approaches to mask performance. Training models have emerged which bear comparison to historical models for training in popular performance. There is a sense of a journeyman’s approach to training and skills acquisition, as older performers pass on personal repertoires of physical routines, sight gags and tricks, audience interaction and patter etc. Students also work as ‘apprentices’ alongside professional puppet and mask makers and peer-to-peer training is discussed whereby previously trained Fabularium performers pass on the repertoire to new performers. The apparent continuity of approach is examined as traditional popular forms are assimilated and passed on via these teaching and training methods.",
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