The evaluation of the decision making processes employed by cadet pilots following a short aeronautical decision-making training program

Wen Chin Li, Don Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many aeronautical decision-making (ADM) mnemonic-based methods exist. However, there is no empirical research that suggests that they are actually effective in improving decision-making. Klein (1993), in his study of naturalistic decision making, suggested that the decision-making process centers around two processes: situation assessment to generate a plausible course of action and mental simulation to evaluate that course of action for risk management. In this study a short, ADM training course was constructed around two mnemonic methods, SHOR (Stimuli, Hypotheses, Options, and Response) and DESIDE (Detect, Estimate, Set safety objectives, Identify, Do, Evaluate). Forty-one pilots from the Republic of China Tactical Training Wing participated: half received a short ADM training course and half did not. After training, the procedural knowledge underpinning their Situation Assessment and Risk Management ability, two skills essential for successful decision-making, were evaluated using pencil and paper-based knowledge tests based upon several demanding tactical flight situations. These scenarios were designed to encompass the six basic types of decision making described by Orasanu (1993); go/no go decisions; recognition-primed decisions; response selection decisions; resource management decisions; non-diagnostic procedural decisions, and decisions requiring creative problem-solving. The results show gains attributable to the decision making training course in both situation assessment and risk management skills. The results strongly suggest that ADM is trainable and such a training course is effective in improving the bases of in-flight decision-making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-333
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Applied Aviation Studies
Volume6
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

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