The effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training and circuit training on maximal oxygen uptake

Stefan T. Birkett, Simon Nichols, Richard Sawrey, Damien Gleadall-Siddall, Gordon McGregor, Lee Ingle

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    Abstract

    Purpose: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) and circuit training (CT) are popular methods of exercise, eliciting improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). However, direct comparisons of these two training methods are limited. We investigated the effects of HIIT and CT on CRF. 

    Methods: Thirty-nine apparently healthy middle-aged participants [HIIT; mean age: 42.5 ± 12.3; V˙ O 2 max 31.5 ± 7.1 (ml kg −1  min −1 ); 52% males; CT; mean age: 41.2 ± 12.9; V˙ O 2 max 31.4 ± 6.8 (ml kg −1  min −1 ); 57% males] were randomly allocated to two sessions per week of HIIT or CT over 8 weeks. HIIT performed ten 1-min cycle-ergometry intervals at > 85% HR max , separated by ten 1-min intervals of active recovery. The CT group performed up to 40-min of CT at 60–80% HR max . CRF was measured using maximum oxygen uptake (V˙ O 2 max ), ventilatory anaerobic threshold (V˙ O 2 at VAT) and maximum oxygen pulse (V˙ O 2 /HR). 

    Results: V˙ O 2 max increased by 12% following HIIT (mean difference 3.9 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: 2.8–4.9; P < 0.001), and 3% in CT (mean difference 1.0 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: − 0.4 to 2.0; P = 0.060). V˙ O 2 at VAT increased by 16% following HIIT (mean difference 2.4 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: 1.6–3.1; P < 0.001) and 4% in CT (mean difference 0.7 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: − 0.1 to 1.4; P = 0.085). V˙ O 2 /HR increased by 11% following HIIT (mean difference 1.4 ml beat −1 ; 95% CI: 0.9–2.0; P < 0.001) and 1% after CT (mean difference 0.3 ml beat −1 ; 95% CI: − 0.3 to 0.8; P = 0.318). 

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that HIIT led to greater improvements in CRF when compared to CT. Clinical trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03700671.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)443-451
    Number of pages9
    JournalSport Sciences for Health
    Volume15
    Issue number2
    Early online date2 May 2019
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

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    Oxygen
    High-Intensity Interval Training
    Circuit-Based Exercise
    Anaerobic Threshold
    Ergometry
    Clinical Trials
    Exercise
    Cardiorespiratory Fitness

    Bibliographical note

    Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate
    credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the
    Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

    Keywords

    • Cardiorespiratory fitness
    • Fidelity
    • HIIT
    • Maximal oxygen consumption
    • Ventilatory anaerobic threshold
    • V˙ O

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

    Cite this

    The effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training and circuit training on maximal oxygen uptake. / Birkett, Stefan T.; Nichols, Simon; Sawrey, Richard; Gleadall-Siddall, Damien; McGregor, Gordon; Ingle, Lee.

    In: Sport Sciences for Health, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.08.2019, p. 443-451.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Birkett, Stefan T. ; Nichols, Simon ; Sawrey, Richard ; Gleadall-Siddall, Damien ; McGregor, Gordon ; Ingle, Lee. / The effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training and circuit training on maximal oxygen uptake. In: Sport Sciences for Health. 2019 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 443-451.
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    abstract = "Purpose: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) and circuit training (CT) are popular methods of exercise, eliciting improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). However, direct comparisons of these two training methods are limited. We investigated the effects of HIIT and CT on CRF. Methods: Thirty-nine apparently healthy middle-aged participants [HIIT; mean age: 42.5 ± 12.3; V˙ O 2 max 31.5 ± 7.1 (ml kg −1  min −1 ); 52{\%} males; CT; mean age: 41.2 ± 12.9; V˙ O 2 max 31.4 ± 6.8 (ml kg −1  min −1 ); 57{\%} males] were randomly allocated to two sessions per week of HIIT or CT over 8 weeks. HIIT performed ten 1-min cycle-ergometry intervals at > 85{\%} HR max , separated by ten 1-min intervals of active recovery. The CT group performed up to 40-min of CT at 60–80{\%} HR max . CRF was measured using maximum oxygen uptake (V˙ O 2 max ), ventilatory anaerobic threshold (V˙ O 2 at VAT) and maximum oxygen pulse (V˙ O 2 /HR). Results: V˙ O 2 max increased by 12{\%} following HIIT (mean difference 3.9 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95{\%} CI: 2.8–4.9; P < 0.001), and 3{\%} in CT (mean difference 1.0 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95{\%} CI: − 0.4 to 2.0; P = 0.060). V˙ O 2 at VAT increased by 16{\%} following HIIT (mean difference 2.4 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95{\%} CI: 1.6–3.1; P < 0.001) and 4{\%} in CT (mean difference 0.7 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95{\%} CI: − 0.1 to 1.4; P = 0.085). V˙ O 2 /HR increased by 11{\%} following HIIT (mean difference 1.4 ml beat −1 ; 95{\%} CI: 0.9–2.0; P < 0.001) and 1{\%} after CT (mean difference 0.3 ml beat −1 ; 95{\%} CI: − 0.3 to 0.8; P = 0.318). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that HIIT led to greater improvements in CRF when compared to CT. Clinical trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03700671.",
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    AU - Birkett, Stefan T.

    AU - Nichols, Simon

    AU - Sawrey, Richard

    AU - Gleadall-Siddall, Damien

    AU - McGregor, Gordon

    AU - Ingle, Lee

    N1 - Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

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    N2 - Purpose: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) and circuit training (CT) are popular methods of exercise, eliciting improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). However, direct comparisons of these two training methods are limited. We investigated the effects of HIIT and CT on CRF. Methods: Thirty-nine apparently healthy middle-aged participants [HIIT; mean age: 42.5 ± 12.3; V˙ O 2 max 31.5 ± 7.1 (ml kg −1  min −1 ); 52% males; CT; mean age: 41.2 ± 12.9; V˙ O 2 max 31.4 ± 6.8 (ml kg −1  min −1 ); 57% males] were randomly allocated to two sessions per week of HIIT or CT over 8 weeks. HIIT performed ten 1-min cycle-ergometry intervals at > 85% HR max , separated by ten 1-min intervals of active recovery. The CT group performed up to 40-min of CT at 60–80% HR max . CRF was measured using maximum oxygen uptake (V˙ O 2 max ), ventilatory anaerobic threshold (V˙ O 2 at VAT) and maximum oxygen pulse (V˙ O 2 /HR). Results: V˙ O 2 max increased by 12% following HIIT (mean difference 3.9 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: 2.8–4.9; P < 0.001), and 3% in CT (mean difference 1.0 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: − 0.4 to 2.0; P = 0.060). V˙ O 2 at VAT increased by 16% following HIIT (mean difference 2.4 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: 1.6–3.1; P < 0.001) and 4% in CT (mean difference 0.7 ml kg −1  min −1 ; 95% CI: − 0.1 to 1.4; P = 0.085). V˙ O 2 /HR increased by 11% following HIIT (mean difference 1.4 ml beat −1 ; 95% CI: 0.9–2.0; P < 0.001) and 1% after CT (mean difference 0.3 ml beat −1 ; 95% CI: − 0.3 to 0.8; P = 0.318). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that HIIT led to greater improvements in CRF when compared to CT. Clinical trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03700671.

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    KW - Fidelity

    KW - HIIT

    KW - Maximal oxygen consumption

    KW - Ventilatory anaerobic threshold

    KW - V˙ O

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