The effect of signal infrastructure on train driver visual behaviour on signal approaches

T. Luke, N. Brook-Carter, R. Smith, A. M. Parkes, A. Mills, E. Grimes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a study carried out by TRL on behalf of the Rail Safety and Standards Board. Data for 86 train drivers on ten different routes were collected using a state-of-the-art eye tracking system. Data for 603 individual signal approaches were analysed to examine the effect of different types of signal infrastructure on visual behaviour. Signals mounted on posts, gantries and cantilevers were examined. Results suggest that gantry signals are looked at more often, for longer and for a greater percentage of the time overall than post signals. This result is explained in terms of the increased complexity of gantry signals. The results have implications in terms of signal identification support in complex areas and the emphasis of route knowledge in driver training.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationContemporary Ergonomics 2005
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the International Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics (CE2005), 5-7 April 2005, Hatfield, UK
Pages578-582
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes
EventAnnual Conference of the Ergonomics Society: Contemporary Ergonomics 2005, CE 2005 - Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Apr 20057 Apr 2005

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference of the Ergonomics Society: Contemporary Ergonomics 2005, CE 2005
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHertfordshire
Period5/04/057/04/05

Fingerprint

Driver training
Rails
driver
driver training
infrastructure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Luke, T., Brook-Carter, N., Smith, R., Parkes, A. M., Mills, A., & Grimes, E. (2005). The effect of signal infrastructure on train driver visual behaviour on signal approaches. In Contemporary Ergonomics 2005: Proceedings of the International Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics (CE2005), 5-7 April 2005, Hatfield, UK (pp. 578-582)

The effect of signal infrastructure on train driver visual behaviour on signal approaches. / Luke, T.; Brook-Carter, N.; Smith, R.; Parkes, A. M.; Mills, A.; Grimes, E.

Contemporary Ergonomics 2005: Proceedings of the International Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics (CE2005), 5-7 April 2005, Hatfield, UK. 2005. p. 578-582.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Luke, T, Brook-Carter, N, Smith, R, Parkes, AM, Mills, A & Grimes, E 2005, The effect of signal infrastructure on train driver visual behaviour on signal approaches. in Contemporary Ergonomics 2005: Proceedings of the International Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics (CE2005), 5-7 April 2005, Hatfield, UK. pp. 578-582, Annual Conference of the Ergonomics Society: Contemporary Ergonomics 2005, CE 2005, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, 5/04/05.
Luke T, Brook-Carter N, Smith R, Parkes AM, Mills A, Grimes E. The effect of signal infrastructure on train driver visual behaviour on signal approaches. In Contemporary Ergonomics 2005: Proceedings of the International Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics (CE2005), 5-7 April 2005, Hatfield, UK. 2005. p. 578-582
Luke, T. ; Brook-Carter, N. ; Smith, R. ; Parkes, A. M. ; Mills, A. ; Grimes, E. / The effect of signal infrastructure on train driver visual behaviour on signal approaches. Contemporary Ergonomics 2005: Proceedings of the International Conference on Contemporary Ergonomics (CE2005), 5-7 April 2005, Hatfield, UK. 2005. pp. 578-582
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