The effect of induced stress on the relationship between perfectionism and unhealthy eating attitudes

Ceri J. Jones, G. Harris, N. Leung, J. Blissett, C. Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has previously been shown that stress situations reveal an association between perfectionism and unhealthy eating attitudes in nonclinical females. The present study aimed to extend these findings by also measuring psychological and physiological reactions to induced stress. Forty-two female university students completed measures of state anxiety, perfectionism and unhealthy eating attitudes on two occasions: an average day and after a task designed to induce stress. Physiological responses to stress were measured before, and immediately after the task. Whilst Body Dissatisfaction was associated with aspects of perfectionism both at baseline and immediately after the stress task, Drive for Thinness was only associated with Concern over Mistakes and Personal Standards after the task. These findings confirm previous work showing that stress encourages a relationship between disturbed eating behaviours and perfectionism and therefore, have implications for prevention and early intervention programmes for eating disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e39-e43
Number of pages5
JournalEating and Weight Disorders
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eating
Physiological Stress
Thinness
Feeding Behavior
Anxiety
Students
Psychology
Perfectionism

Keywords

  • Eating
  • Perfectionism
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The effect of induced stress on the relationship between perfectionism and unhealthy eating attitudes. / Jones, Ceri J.; Harris, G.; Leung, N.; Blissett, J.; Meyer, C.

In: Eating and Weight Disorders, Vol. 12, No. 2, 06.2007, p. e39-e43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, Ceri J. ; Harris, G. ; Leung, N. ; Blissett, J. ; Meyer, C. / The effect of induced stress on the relationship between perfectionism and unhealthy eating attitudes. In: Eating and Weight Disorders. 2007 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. e39-e43.
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