The effect of exercise intensity on coincidence anticipation performance at different stimulus speeds

Michael J. Duncan, M. Lyons, Mike Smith

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise intensity on coincidence anticipation timing [CAT] performance at different stimulus speeds. Fourteen young adults (11 males and 3 females) volunteered to participate in the study following ethical approval. After familiarisation, coincidence anticipation was measured using the Bassin Anticipation Timer under three conditions: rest, moderate-intensity and high-intensity exercise with stimulus speeds of 3, 5 and 8 mph, set using an incremental running protocol until the participants reached a steady state of 70% and 90% of heart rate reserve (HRR), respectively. Results indicated a significant exercise intensity×stimulus speed interaction (p=0.0001) for absolute error (AE). There were no significant differences in AE across exercise intensities at a stimulus speed of 3 mph (p>0.05). AE was poorer during high-intensity exercise (90% HRR) compared to rest (p=0.022), and moderate-intensity (70% HRR) exercise (all, p=0.004 or better) at 5 and 8 mph. Variable error (VE) was similar across exercise intensities at stimulus speeds of both 3 and 5 mph (p>0.05). At a stimulus speed of 8 mph, VE was significantly poorer during high-intensity exercise compared to rest (p=0.006) and moderate-intensity exercise (p=0.008). There were no significant differences for constant error (p>0.05) across exercise intensities or stimulus speeds. High-intensity exercise is associated with poorer CAT performance. However, stimulus speed plays a key role within this association where faster stimulus speeds were associated with a more marked decrease in coincidence anticipation performance.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)559-566
    JournalEuropean Journal of Sport Science
    Volume13
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Bibliographical note

    The full text is not available from the repository.
    This is an electronic version of an article published in the European Journal of Sport Science, 13 (5), pp.559-566. The European Journal of Sport Science is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17461391.2012.752039#.U5rT7EpwY3E .

    Keywords

    • Bassin Anticipation Timer
    • exercise intensity
    • interceptive actions

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