The effect of badminton specific exercise on badminton short serve performance in competition and practice climates

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Abstract

This study examined the effects of changes in physiological and psychological arousal on badminton short serve performance in competitive and practice climates. Twenty competitive badminton players (10 males, 10 females) volunteered to participate in the study following ethics approval. After familiarisation, Badminton short serve performance was measured at rest, mid-way through and at the end of a badminton specific exercise protocol in 2 conditions; competition vs practice. Ratings of cognitive and somatic anxiety were assessed at three time points prior to badminton short serve performance using the Mental Readiness Form 3 (MRF3). Heart Rate (HR) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) were assessed during the exercise protocol. Results indicated better short serve performance was evident in practice compared to competition (P = 0.034). RPE values were significantly higher in the competition condition compared to practice (P = 0.007). Cognitive anxiety intensity was significantly lower post exercise in the practice condition compared to competition (P = 0.001). Cognitive anxiety direction showed greater debilitation post exercise in the competition condition compared to practice (P = 0.01). Somatic anxiety intensity increased from pre, to mid to post exercise (P= 0.001) irrespective of condition. This study suggests that badminton serve performance is negatively affected when physiological arousal, via badminton specific exercise, and cognitive anxiety, via perceived competition, are high. Publisher Statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Sport Science on 13/07/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17461391.2016.1203362
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-126
JournalEuropean Journal of Sport Science
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2016

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Racquet Sports
Climate
Anxiety
Arousal
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Ethics
Sports
Heart Rate
Psychology

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Sport Science on 13/07/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17461391.2016.1203362

Keywords

  • Sport-specific exercise
  • Anxiety
  • Competition
  • Performance

Cite this

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title = "The effect of badminton specific exercise on badminton short serve performance in competition and practice climates",
abstract = "This study examined the effects of changes in physiological and psychological arousal on badminton short serve performance in competitive and practice climates. Twenty competitive badminton players (10 males, 10 females) volunteered to participate in the study following ethics approval. After familiarisation, Badminton short serve performance was measured at rest, mid-way through and at the end of a badminton specific exercise protocol in 2 conditions; competition vs practice. Ratings of cognitive and somatic anxiety were assessed at three time points prior to badminton short serve performance using the Mental Readiness Form 3 (MRF3). Heart Rate (HR) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) were assessed during the exercise protocol. Results indicated better short serve performance was evident in practice compared to competition (P = 0.034). RPE values were significantly higher in the competition condition compared to practice (P = 0.007). Cognitive anxiety intensity was significantly lower post exercise in the practice condition compared to competition (P = 0.001). Cognitive anxiety direction showed greater debilitation post exercise in the competition condition compared to practice (P = 0.01). Somatic anxiety intensity increased from pre, to mid to post exercise (P= 0.001) irrespective of condition. This study suggests that badminton serve performance is negatively affected when physiological arousal, via badminton specific exercise, and cognitive anxiety, via perceived competition, are high. Publisher Statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Sport Science on 13/07/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17461391.2016.1203362",
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author = "Duncan, {Michael J.}",
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N2 - This study examined the effects of changes in physiological and psychological arousal on badminton short serve performance in competitive and practice climates. Twenty competitive badminton players (10 males, 10 females) volunteered to participate in the study following ethics approval. After familiarisation, Badminton short serve performance was measured at rest, mid-way through and at the end of a badminton specific exercise protocol in 2 conditions; competition vs practice. Ratings of cognitive and somatic anxiety were assessed at three time points prior to badminton short serve performance using the Mental Readiness Form 3 (MRF3). Heart Rate (HR) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) were assessed during the exercise protocol. Results indicated better short serve performance was evident in practice compared to competition (P = 0.034). RPE values were significantly higher in the competition condition compared to practice (P = 0.007). Cognitive anxiety intensity was significantly lower post exercise in the practice condition compared to competition (P = 0.001). Cognitive anxiety direction showed greater debilitation post exercise in the competition condition compared to practice (P = 0.01). Somatic anxiety intensity increased from pre, to mid to post exercise (P= 0.001) irrespective of condition. This study suggests that badminton serve performance is negatively affected when physiological arousal, via badminton specific exercise, and cognitive anxiety, via perceived competition, are high. Publisher Statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Sport Science on 13/07/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17461391.2016.1203362

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