The effect of active brain-breaks on fundamental movement skills and executive functioning of Grade one children in Cape Town, South Africa

Odelia van Stryp, Michael J. Duncan, Eileen Africa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Developing children’s FMS and executive function is a critical aspect of early childhood. The aim was to evaluate the fundamental movement skills (FMS) and executive function. The objectives were to investigate the locomotor and object control skills as well as inhibitory control and working memory of the selected children. Grade 1 (6–8-years-old) learners (N = 157) in Cape Town, South Africa were assessed with the Test for Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2) and Head Toes Knees and Shoulder task, before and after a 6-week active brain-break intervention. Participants were divided into a control (n = 53) and an experimental (n = 104) group. The results indicated an overall statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) for pre- and post-testing in both groups for FMS executive functioning (p < 0.01).The results highlight the importance of exposing Grade 1 learners to FMS and physical activity bouts during academic lessons to create opportunities for movement, development of FMS and enhancement of executive functioning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-117
Number of pages16
JournalEarly Child Development and Care
Volume194
Issue number1
Early online date30 Nov 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Bibliographical note

© 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Keywords

  • Movement patterns
  • classroom-based interventions
  • cognitive performance
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology

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