The development of geotextiles incorporating slow-release phosphate beads for the maintenance of oil degrading bacteria in permeable pavements

Steve Coupe, G. E. Spicer, Daniel Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract


The development of a self-fertilising geotextile mat designed to provide a sustained slow-release of required inorganic nutrients for the growth of oil degrading microorganisms in porous pavement systems (PPS) is reported. The system comprises a geotextile spun from polymer fibres containing spherical phosphated polymer beads that release phosphate upon contact with water at a desirable level for microbial growth. Initial results using model PPS have shown that the self-fertilising geotextile system works extremely effectively as increased microbial activity has been observed throughout the experiment, illustrating that the oil-degrading bacteria can effectively utilise this polymer composite as a suitable nutrient source.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-280
Number of pages7
JournalWater Science and Technology
Volume54
Issue number6-7
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Geotextiles
geotextile
pavement
Pavements
Bacteria
Phosphates
polymer
phosphate
Nutrients
bacterium
oil
Polymers
nutrient
Microorganisms
microbial activity
microorganism
Fibers
Composite materials
Oils
Water

Cite this

The development of geotextiles incorporating slow-release phosphate beads for the maintenance of oil degrading bacteria in permeable pavements. / Coupe, Steve; Spicer, G. E.; Lynch, Daniel.

In: Water Science and Technology, Vol. 54, No. 6-7, 2006, p. 273-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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