The association of dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) and Mediterranean diet with mental health, sleep quality and chronotype in women with overweight and obesity: a cross-sectional study

Farideh Shiraseb, Atieh Mirzababaei, Elnaz Daneshzad, Darya Khosravinia, Cain C. T. Clark, Khadijeh Mirzaei

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Abstract

Purpose: Mental and sleep disorders are global public health problems, especially in Middle Eastern countries, and are significantly associated with circadian rhythm. This study sought to investigate the association between the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) and Mediterranean diet scores and mental health, sleep quality, and circadian rhythm. Methods: We enrolled 266 overweight and obese women, and depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS) score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Morning–Evening Questionnaire (MEQ), were assessed. The Mediterranean and DASH diet score was measured using a validated semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). The physical activity was evaluated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Analysis of variance and analysis of covariance, chi-square, and multinomial logistic regression tests were used as appropriate. Results: Our results showed that there was a significant inverse association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and mild and moderate anxiety scores (p < 0.05). In addition, there was an inverse association between adherence to the DASH diet and the risk of severe depression and extremely severe stress scores (p < 0.05). Moreover, higher adherence to both dietary scores was associated with good sleep quality (p < 0.05). There was a significant relationship between circadian rhythm and the DASH diet (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A significant association exists between a DASH and Mediterranean diet with sleep status, mental health, and chronotype in women of childbearing age with obesity and overweight. Level of evidence: Level V, Cross-sectional observational study.

Original languageEnglish
Article number57
Number of pages14
JournalEating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online date3 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Jul 2023

Bibliographical note

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Funder

This study was supported by the Tehran University of Medical Sciences and by grants from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Grants ID: 46718_212_3_98).

Keywords

  • Mental health
  • Mediterranean diet
  • DASH
  • Obesity
  • Circadian rhythm
  • Sleep quality

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