The association between glycemic index and glycemic load and quality of life among overweight and obese women: a cross-sectional study

Niloufar Rasaei, Melika Fallah, Fatemeh Gholami, Mehdi Karimi, Sahar Noori, Niki Bahrampour, Cain C.T. Clark, Khadijeh Mirzaei

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    Abstract

    Background: The association between different dietary approaches and quality of life (QoL) has been well-demonstrated in previous research. However, the relationship between glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with different dimensions of QoL has not been established. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between GI and GL with QoL in overweight and obese women. Methods: Two hundred seventy-six overweight and obese women (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2), aged 18–64 years old, were included in this cross-sectional study. The amount of dietary intake and GI and GL indexes were established using a valid and reliable Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) containing 147 items. Body composition (using bioimpedance analysis), anthropometrics, and physical activity were assessed. Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and hs-CRP were also measured, whilst QoL was measured using the SF-36 (short-form-36), self-administered, questionnaire. Result: Analyses were performed using multivariable linear regression, considering a wide range of confounding variables, such as age, physical activity, BMI, education, job, smoking, and marriage. We found a significant negative association between glycemic load and quality of life (β = -0.07, 95%CI = -0.13_ -0.01, p = 0.01). No significant associations were observed between glycemic index and quality of life (β = -0.03, 95%CI = -0.81_ 0.75, p = 0.93). Conclusion: We observed a significant negative association between QoL and GL, but not GI, among overweight and obese women in Iran. Our results need to be confirmed with further well-designed and adequately powered studies that control for clinical confounders.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number30
    JournalBMC Nutrition
    Volume9
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 13 Feb 2023

    Bibliographical note

    Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

    Funder

    This study was supported by TUMS and grant ID was 99–3212-51715.
    The authors thank the laboratory of Nutrition Sciences and Dietetics in Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). We are grateful to all of the participants for their contribution to this research. This study was approved by the Research ethics committee of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran with ethics number IR.TUMS.MEDICINE.REC.1399.636. All participants signed a written informed consent that was approved by this committee prior to enrollment in the study. Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Keywords

    • Diet
    • Glycemic index
    • Glycemic load
    • Obesity
    • Overweight
    • Quality of life

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
    • Nutrition and Dietetics
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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